2:49 am, May 30, 2015

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  • Queen Amidala said it best
    contrarian
    Queen Amidala: [speaking to Chancellor Palpatine] "It is clear to me now that the Republic no longer functions. I pray you will bring sanity and compassion back to the Senate." Remember what happened next?
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Rubber Stamps
    Rob
    In my agency every employee goes through a background investigation every 5 years. I've yet to see anyone lose their security clearance as a result. Some activists have renewed the calls for expanded background checks for gun buyers as if that will somehow prevent future incidents of gun violence. Maybe...maybe not. One thing is for certain, the numerous background checks conducted on the Navy Yard shooter didn't work. Why? Because background checks are rubber stamped. It took all of 24 hours for us to discover everything on this shooter. Shouldn't this same information been uncovered in 44 days? Come on!
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • It isn't that simple
    marxwj
    There are 5 million people in the US with security clearances. The government can't keep an active file on each and every one of them. They can barely keep up with the 10 year reviews. Besides, he was in the military, and as such was pretty much rubber stamped anyway. For the level of clearance he recieved, none of this history would have mattered up until the police report in Rhode Island. Even then, they reported it to base security that likely didn't have a clue who the guy was. He was a computer tech working for a sub contractor. By the time they figured it out, he was transfered to another base in DC, and later on to Texas. Base security is not in charge of running clearances for anyone. They are access control only, and as often as not they are just another contractor.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • No simple solution, but security process rushed for wrong reasons - money
    Honest Broker
    I agree with most everyone's points and would be hard to catch these folks early, but you have to admit that the security process is a bit rushed so more likely for mistakes. The politicians felt that they should replace the background investigation agency along with the employees with a contracted company. I seem to remember it was for efficiency, but more like they could reap some of the profits versus if it stayed a Govt organization. The outsourcing pendulum has swung too far to the right, but the politicians hate to lose all this revenue it generates for them. POGO.ORG continues to pull data from contract costs versus using Govt employees, and as a minimum its a 1.83 markup yet the politicians continue to push using contracted services. The recent recall elections in Colorado may have set the stage to possibly see most of Capitol Hill up for a serious review. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court threw a curve ball into the fight by allowing Corp America to invest millions to billions into campaigns. All this money seems to be clouding everyone's judgement, so better be prepared to duck out of the office if you hear shots. Govt, an exciting place to work isn't it?
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Armchair Quarterbacking
    marxwj
    After every incident like this people second guess processes and procedures, and a review is a good idea, but I don't really think it will lead to much. The shooter was a veteran with an appropriate ID. Even without the CAC badge, he would have been able to get on a base that is open to the general public almost every day of the week. As for the previous system catching him, it is very unlikely. The old system basically gathered the same information, just without computers. He had not been charged or convicted of any crime. He sought help with insomnia, a common ailment anywhere, and for someone that travelled as much as he did certainly understandable. He was granted a security clearance while in the military. Clearances are usually reviewed every 10 years. Since there are over 5 million people with security clearances, that means 500,000 are being reviewed every year. That is on top of likely over 100,000 new applications every year. All they have ever looked for is basically criminal convictions, drug abuse, and overwhelming debt. This guy had none of these, and as such would have passed any such clearance process, whether it took months or not. In any case, the clearance was only required because as a computer tech, he had access to data. Access to the Navy Yard and the building don't require a clearance in and of themselves. Most of our maintenance contractors don't have a clearance.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • ignoring warning signs
    Rob
    The armchair quarterback analogy doesn't work with me when it comes to mass murders. It seems like with most mass murders we learn shortly after the incident about numerous warning signs that were ignored. There were plenty of warning signs with this guy that should have raised red flags. The same is true with the Fort Hood shooter. Oh, and have we forgotten about 9/11 and all the warning signs leading up to that day that were blown off? Being more proactive versus reactive could help in preventing future mass murders.
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