10:23 am, April 17, 2014

FederalNewsRadio.com - Purpose of Comments statement Click to show

Hubbard Radio, LLC encourages site users to express their opinions by posting comments. Our goal is to maintain a civil dialogue in which readers feel comfortable. At times, the comment boards following articles, blog posts and other content can descend to personal attacks. Please do not engage in such behavior here. We encourage your thoughtful comments which:

  • Have a positive and constructive tone
  • Are on topic, clear and to-the-point
  • Are respectful toward others and their opinions

Hubbard Radio, LLC reserves the right to remove comments which do not conform to these criteria.

  • 11
       

  • Health premiums: It pays to go postal
    vetdude
    Cheaper health insurance premiums yet the USPS is bleeding money faster than a Class IV hemorrhage. Interesting.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Who pays the premiums?
    Liam Skye
    Health benefit premiums for postal employees cost the taxpayers exactly $0. Health benefits for employees of most other federal agencies cost the taxpayers tens of billions of dollars. Interesting.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Who pays?
    ExHUD
    Who pays their premiums?
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • USPS Pays
    Liam Skye
    The employer always pays the employer's portion of the premium. Most, but not all, federal agencies are funded by the taxpayers. USPS is not funded by the taxpayers. So the taxpayers are paying the employer's portion of the premium for HUD, the military, DoE, etc. but they are paying it for USPS employees. Similarly with the pension contributions - all employees make the same contributions but the employer's portion is funded by taxpayers for most agencies and the military, but the taxpayers do not contribute anything to the USPS pensions.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Nice!
    Liam Skye
    That should read "but they are NOT paying it for USPS employees."
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • USPS
    Bud
    Liam,I need an education here.Who pays to fund the USPS.The PO loses more than it receives in annual revenue.So who is covering the cost overruns.And who will bail out the PO.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • USPS
    hrdcorefan
    The United States Postal Service operates solely on funds derived from the sales of products and services, the only taxpayer funds involved, amounting today to $100 million a year, subsidizes mail for the blind and official mail to overseas voters. In 1970 Congress transformed the Post Office into the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). The new quasi-public agency was intended to put the Postal Office on a more business like footing. The Postal Service was allowed to borrow from it's $15 billion line of credit from the U.S. Treasury to make needed capital investments and was given more flexibility in how it spent its money. In return, Congress required the Postal Service to become self-sufficient. However, a congressional mandate is killing the U.S. Postal Service. A 2006 postal reform law requires the USPS to pre-fund 75 years' worth of future retiree health benefits within just 10 years. At the behest of the Office of Personnel Management and the Government Accountability Office, and to make the law appear not to cost the government money (i.e., to be “revenue neutral”), Congress included in the law that destructive pre-funding mandate. No other federal agency or private enterprise is forced to pre-fund similar benefits like this, especially on such an aggressive schedule. According to USPS financial statements, pre-funding accounts for 80 percent of the red ink in the first three quarters of fiscal 2012. Overall, since pre-funding went into effect in 2007, it accounts for 83 percent of the Postal Service’s losses. That means that only 17 percent of all the red ink stems from actual mail operations, including the decline in first-class mail. The irony of Congress continuing to insist on pre-funding is that the Postal Service already has funded nearly 50 percent of the FUTURE retiree health benefits obligation ($47 billion of the $90.3 billion future obligation), more than any company in America and enough for decades into the future. That probably is enough to stop all the payments and just let the interest do the work of building up the fund. One last point about the retiree health care fund. Even though there's plenty of money in the fund, the premiums for CURRENT retirees continue to be paid on a "pay as you go" model like the rest of the federal government and that amount is included in the regular operating expenses.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • You are fantasizing again
    Liam Skye
    What "bailout?" USPS does not need a "bailout," has not asked for a "bailout," nobody has offered a "bailout," and no credible individual has ever mentioned USPS and the word "bailout" in the same sentence. Your use of that term makes me suspect that you have an agenda or political position that makes you wish there is some kind of bailout involved. The facts, as they stand today, do not support that position. The irresponsible actions and childish games of brinksmanship being played by Congress are doing severe damage to USPS' image and brand (as they have already done to the full faith and credit of the United States of America). I hope the damage they are doing does not cause USPS to lose its self-sufficiency and prevent it from continuing to provide excellent low-cost, service to the American people at no cost to the taxpayers as it has done for the past 40 years.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • in re the NUF...
    Jerry A.
    Wear a ninja mask to my workplace... on a military base. Really? No thanks, I don't want to liven up your slow news day by being shot.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • My experience with APWU
    CSRS Dinosaur
    I live in Southwest Florida and am not a USPS employee but did try their APWU health coverage for a year. I figured there are thousands of USPS employees everywhere so their health insurance would be widely accepted. And it is, in certain areas like DC. But here, when you whip out the APWU card, they look at it with suspicion. Basically, where I live, anything other than Blue Cross is not well received by medical providers. Another thing I didn't like about APWU was being forced to pay a union fee to sign up. It's not a huge fee, but that's not the point. AND, even after the year was up and I had gone back to Blue Cross, APWU kept sending me reminders to pay my union fee. Very annoying.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • We all could use more insurance
    dailycheese
    Let's see, health insurance, life insurance, dental insurance, long-term care insurance, auto insurance, homeowner insurance, trip insurance, renter insurance, and burial insurance. We could spend our income just to have insurance.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }