2:02 pm, March 3, 2015

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  • Once again..
    lonzo71
    We cut jobs here rather than close bases overseas that aren't needed anymore. We can point to over 10 bases, TEN that are no longer needed to serve OUR country interest but yet, we rather cut jobs here in the states....I just dont understand this....we reduce here at home before we stop giving aid to other countries that DO NOT NEED or WANT IT...This is the CHANGE we need
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  • These Jobs are unfunded
    JackTH
    The federal government is working on a $1.3 trillion funding gap. In various estimates this represents 35% to 43% of the federal budget being UNFUNDED! We need to consider creative ways to cut costs and close the gap. This is only a good start. We get rid of a lot of fat to close the funding gap. Federal Workers are of the highest white collar and blue collar workers in the world. They are not expected to perform and therefore we need more feds to do a job lesser people can in the private sector. Soldiers are paid much less (more like typical private sector wages) and have had training in discipline, dedication and commitment. The defense department would be wise to implement this strategy department wide in cutting costs.
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  • Retention of Green Suiters
    opie7
    Personally as a Army Civilian I don't like this proposal, but for the Army as a whole this is a way of keeping experienced NCOs and Officers in the Army. Should we have to ramp-up for another conflict, we will have a cadre of battle-tested Soldiers ready to lead new Soldiers into battle. We have paid too great of a price in the past 11 years, to lose the knowledge and experience of our current warriors.
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  • I respect your support
    JackTH
    You truly recognize the benefit in keeping this highly skilled and dedicated team on board to the benefit of the department and the country.
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  • Odierno is one of the most backward Army Chiefs ever!
    Mike McMike
    This is just more evidence of his lack of intellect. Another large man with a small mind promoted to the top of the US Army. We need more people in uniform driving desks? Um, no, we don;t.
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  • Ummm... Yes We Do!
    TheNewWyatt
    If you remember the late 90's, where the military gave away thousands of jobs to the contractors and civilians, jobs that military personal were doing. This saves the military a boat load of money to have the service member do the job they were actually trained to do. These are not all desk jobs either, we are talking cooks, MP's, and yes people in the military who have desk jobs. I can also say from experience, the service member has done these jobs with more professionalism and respect than any contractor or civilian I ever delt with in the same position.
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  • Sorry, that's backward
    Mike McMike
    I also get a kick out of people saying that contractors are so much more costly. That's bull, Military training, benefits, deployment and re-deployment retirement, healthcare, and many other policies make military people much more expensive than they know. If you see a lack of professionalism in contractors ask yourself why their government master can't manage them better. Also, note that many of them are retired military. Training people to be soldiers, then putting them in jobs that don't require soldiers is really backward and expensive. There are other solutions to stemming the brain drain. By the way, I didn't see where NCOs are soldiers were performing badly early in the two recent wars. Sure things got even more tightened up during the the second and third deployments, but there is nothing "fatal" about letting soldiers serve as civilian contractors.
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  • 100% correct!
    JackTH
    My Co-workers in the Contractor I worked for had federal apps maintained at all times to get those far more lucrative jobs. They were chomping at the bit to get them.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Interesting
    Time Bandit
    I was a defense contractor for 10 years before I was laid off, 5 yrs in DC. I too tried getting into the gov't but I found it interesting how the hiring process worked. If you knew someone on the inside that had tenure or a position higher on the food chain, you had a good chance to get in. The other thing is you needed someone to vouch for you, if you didn't, forget it. It was that way with the contracting company I worked for, teens of management personnel, who wanted to intern, were given internships within the company without having to go through a process. Then those who just graduated from college were placed in higher lucrative positions, made more money but had ZERO experience in the Navy environment. I expressed interest in certain positions but was always turned down, but those who had relatives in the company were given first dibs at jobs.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • I saw both sides
    Time Bandit
    I used to be a defense contractor for the Navy for 10 years, 5 years was in Washington, D.C. at the WNY. I saw my share of do-nothings, not only on the gov't side but the contractor side as well. I was laid off in 2010 because funding was retracted by the PM in the sub grouo I was in, I loved my job. I highly enjoyed working for the Navy and honored that they trusted me with a clearance and the job I had. The job I have now is totally different, nothing to do with defense or contracting. You noted, "If you see a lack of professionalism in contractors ask yourself why their government master can't manage them better." When I worked for the Navy, even though I was a lackey contractor, I always said "Good Morning/Good Afternoon Sir". My parents raised me to respect those in military uniform until they say otherwise, I can't speak for others but I will say I saw both contractors and gov't workers be unprofessional towards Naval personnel.
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • What an excellent idea...
    Sunna W
    Most military come to DC for their "promotion" tour. Given the fact that they are seen as an asset owned by the US govt., (they are on call 23/7) they will work until they drop from exhaustion. They will walk home if they miss their car pool, they can be denied leave, and, most of them can count on the wife to take up the slack with the kids and everything else. So, from a pure dollars and cents point of view, if the military is trying to cut costs, bringing these folks in to replace a contractor or a civilian makes perfect sense. However, the very fact that this is being considered and that two sectors of people will lose their jobs in DC because of this decision supports the fact that they don't give a rat's bottom for the morale / welfare of these folks and their families much less what this idea would do to the local economy.
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  • Well . . .
    JackTH
    I dont think it has anything to do with caring about whoever. Total Defense spending has jumped $430 billion or more since 2001! We are running up $1.3 trillion deficits. Do you really think this can continue? We broke the system and now the debt is due. What ever the pointed heads thought they were doing these last 10 years, obviously made a mistake. Think of it this way, what happens if we didn't do this? Then think of the number of people out on the streets! What if China stops buying our debt? What if the bond market bottoms out? If you think this one small move is bad for the federal workers, think what not dong something will do. For the federal workforce and federal contractors, the next year is going to be a tough one!
    { "Agree":"1","Funny":"1","Insightful":"1","Disagree":"-1","Offensive":"-1","Troll":"-1" }
  • Too late to prevent fatal brain drain from Active Duty corps
    Military Medical Corpse
    When I joined the military in 1981, it was expected that active duty personnel would be running the military. Fast forward to 2001-2012, where "force shaping" has resulted in a toxic brain drain of the best and the brightest across the entire spectrum of the active force. As a board-certified specialist physician and graduate of USU, I was forced to watch as Andrews lost 10/12 active duty slots in my AFSC, only to have them replaced by civilian contractors being paid THREE TIMES as much as I was. Many of these contract physicians had substance abuse or other issues which had interfered with their civilian careers and motivated them to sign up for military service at age 45. Unlike myself, the contractors lacked the "opportunity" for a 6-18 month vacation without their families in the 120 degree desert sands. To add insult to injury, the dude who was IN COMMAND of overseas medical deployments in 2005 (when I separated) was a civilian. Accordingly, for that and many other reasons, I resigned my regular commission as a senior LtCol and left the USAF after 19 years total active duty, without retiring. The military can "grow" a replacement for me from within the ranks in only 30 years (4 years of college, 4 years of med school, 4 years of residency, and 18 years of experience after residency). Until then, active duty troops can look forward to being malpracticed upon by brand new PAs, nurse midwives, or nurse practitioner grads commanded by all-powerful RNs, given that all of the best docs have been *intentionally* driven out of the active duty military over the past decade, in favor of contractors and less-qualified physician "extenders". -- http://www.medicalcorpse.com
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