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11:08 am, October 23, 2014

Federal Drive

Monday - Friday, 6-9 a.m.

Host Tom Temin brings you the latest news affecting the federal community each weekday morning, featuring interviews with top government executives and contractors. Listen live from 6 to 9 a.m. or download archived interviews below.

Thursday - 10/23/2014, 08:38am EDT
Thursday federal headlines - October 23, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, the FBI is changing the way it deals with whistleblowers, the DHS inspector general calls action taken by the Secret Service's deputy director a serious lapse in judgment and the military beefs up security at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery following a shooting at the Parliament building in Ottawa.

Thursday - 10/23/2014, 01:10am EDT
Thad Allen, Executive Vice President, Booz Allen Hamilton

The government has an official Ebola Czar as of today. Vice President Joe Biden's former Chief of Staff, Ron Klain, begins work as the chief coordinator of the federal response to the crisis. Thad Allen is executive vice president of Booz Allen Hamilton. He's also a former government czar himself, overseeing the government's response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf in 2010 and to Hurricane Katrina. He joined Emily Kopp on the Federal Drive to map out the road ahead for Ron Klain as czar.

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Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 04:04pm EDT
Carrie Hessler-Radelet, Director, Peace Corps

Americans are breaking down the doors to join the little old Peace Corps, virtually speaking. More than 17,000 people applied for two year service positions over the last year. That's the most applications the agency's received since 1992. Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to explain what contributed to the agency's recruiting success.

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Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 04:02pm EDT
Joe Petrillo, Procurement Attorney, Petrillo & Powell PLLC

Consider this: You're a contracting officer. Your technical representative recommends one contractor out of three who are competing for task orders. You give eight orders to the recommended one, two to another and zero to the third contractor. Now, suppose your representatives were bribed by that first contractor. Yep, it all ended up in court. In this week's legal loop, Procurement Attorney Joe Petrillo joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss the lessons learned.

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Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 01:05pm EDT
Roger Cressey and Kiersten Todt, Liberty Group Ventures

The deeper they dive into cybersecurity, the closer government and industry get. The Defense Department is requiring contractors to report, within three days, any cyber breach that threatens trade secrets or government data. Civilian agencies are looking at a similar rule. Former federal cyber officials Kiersten Todt and Roger Cressey, now with Liberty Group Ventures, joined Emily Kopp on the Federal Drive to discuss the new rule.

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Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 01:00pm EDT
Kate Schweit, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Active shooter situations are more rare but more deadly on military bases than on other government property. That finding comes from a FBI report on active shooter situations. The FBI finds that since 2000 there have been five incidents on military property with 27 people killed and 43 wounded. Agent Kate Schweit is the senior executive program manager for the FBI's Active Shooter Program. She joined Emily Kopp on the Federal Drive with details.

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Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 10:03am EDT
Wednesday federal headlines - October 22, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, Federal retirees will receive a 1.7 percent cost-of-living adjustment in 2015, two senators are drafting a bill to curb the use of paid administrative leave across government and Sen. Tom Coburn (R- Okla.) releases his annual wastebook report on federal spending.

Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 04:18pm EDT
Jared Serbu, DoD Reporter, Federal News Radio

More laboratory testing -- and less of an emphasis on commercial technologies -- lead the changes the Army is making to the Network Integration Evaluations process. That process began four years ago. The Army designed the NIE to put new systems in the hands of soldiers, so they can put those technologies through their paces before they go out to live-fire battlefields. Federal News Radio DoD Reporter Jared Serbu has the details.

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Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 04:04pm EDT
Charlie Armstrong, CIO, Customs and Border Protection

Federal chief information officers say overwhelmingly that cybersecurity is their top priority. That data is from the 2014 Federal News Radio Chief Information Officer survey. Charlie Armstrong is the chief information officer for the Customs and Border Protection directorate in the Homeland Security Department. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he told Federal News Radio executive editor Jason Miller how CBP's priorities begin and end with cybersecurity.

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Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 01:15pm EDT
Jonathan Aberman, Managing Director, Amplifier Ventures

Ebola is more than a nasty virus. It's a national security concern, a big data problem, a technology challenge and perhaps a business opportunity. Jonathan Aberman is founder and CEO of Amplifier Ventures. He joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss the business and technology implications of Ebola.

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Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 01:05pm EDT
J. David Cox, President, American Federation of Government Employees

Some Homeland Security employees are worried about their exposure to the Ebola virus. Many of them work at the Transportation Security Administration and Customs and Border Protection. A few U.S. airports are screening passengers for Ebola. CBP employees will perform most of the checks. The American Federation of Government Employees wants agency management to put the right precautions in place. AFGE President J. David Cox joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with details.

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Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 01:00pm EDT
Allison Hickey, Under Secretary for Benefits, Veterans Affairs Department

The Veterans Affairs Department has broken its own records in processing disability and pension claims. The agency made its way through 1.3 million claims in fiscal 2014. That surpasses 2013's record by 150,000. One result is that VA's disability claims backlog fell to its lowest number in four years. It's down 60 percent from the peak of March 2013. These numbers put VA on track to meet its 2015 goals. Allison Hickey is the undersecretary for benefits at the VA. She joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to explain how the agency was able to plow through so many cases.

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Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 01:00pm EDT
Gene Aloise, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

The Air Force spent nearly half a billion dollars on airplanes, only to turn them into scrap metal. Now, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction is wondering why. The planes were Italian-made transports intended for use by the Afghan Air Force. But the Afghans couldn't maintain the planes and the program ended after they'd only flow for a few hours. Deputy Inspector General Gene Aloise joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with details.

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Tuesday - 10/21/2014, 08:01am EDT
Tuesday federal headlines - October 21, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, the number of veterans running for Congressional office is dropping, U.S. military officials say it's still too early to tell if air drops to Kurdish forces in Khobani will help and the Government Accountability Office sustains a protest against the embattled contractor USIS

Monday - 10/20/2014, 04:36pm EDT
Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP and Member, Public Contracting Institute

Salesmen have an old saying, nothing happens until someone buys something. When the government buys something, all sorts of things can happen, good and bad. For the next 10 Tuesdays, we'll be bringing to life a blog series called 10 Myths of Government Contracting. The author, Tim Sullivan, is a 40-year contracting veteran from both sides of industry and government. Now he's a partner in the law firm Thompson Coburn. His blog gives insight to companies that contract with the federal government and those looking for new opportunities. In today's installment, Sullivan joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to explain the first myth: you should never lodge a protest.

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Monday - 10/20/2014, 11:18am EDT
Mathew Tully, Founding Partner, Tully Rinckey PLLC

The Supreme Court is set to hear the case of a former Federal Air Marshal turned whistleblower on Nov. 4. Robert MacLean was fired after he told the media about the Transportation Security Administration's decision to use fewer air marshals on long distance flights. This is the first case the Supreme Court will hear that directly involves a federal whistleblower. Matt Tully, founding partner of the law firm Tully Rinckey, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with details.

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Monday - 10/20/2014, 11:11am EDT
Jeremy Grant, National Institute of Standards and Technology

You might be a dog on the Internet, but nobody can tell for sure. Confidence in who people say they are online is vital to a cyber secure future for government and industry. People at the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace have been working on this problem within the Commerce Department for a couple of years now. Jeremy Grant is senior executive advisor for Identity Management at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss some recent progress.

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Monday - 10/20/2014, 08:57am EDT
Emily Kopp, Reporter, Federal News Radio

The Federal Salary Council voted to add 13 cities to a list of communities where federal employees are paid more. The council was aiming to close a growing gap between federal employees and private counterparts in certain regions of the country. But the administration has frozen locality pay until at least 2016. Federal News Radio's Emily Kopp joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss what the council recommends.

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Monday - 10/20/2014, 08:55am EDT
Jason Miller, Executive Editor, Federal News Radio

The rash of commercial and government online identity thefts has prompted a reaction from the White House. It's giving federal agencies a lead role in better protecting web transactions. It starts with the government itself. President Barack Obama is making big changes to the procedures for federal credit cards and other payment methods. In his bi-weekly feature Inside the Reporter's Notebook, Federal News Radio's Executive Editor Jason Miller joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss what you should expect starting in January.

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Monday - 10/20/2014, 08:16am EDT
Monday federal headlines - October 20, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, a woman found vomiting in a Pentagon parking lot does not have Ebola, employees at the Veterans Affairs Department are not too pleased with their senior leaders and the White House wants to improve the security of federal credit card purchases.

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