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7:42 am, October 25, 2014

DoD News

Adele Ratcliff, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy

The Defense Department wants to maintain its technological advantage in warfare. To do so, it relies on the U.S. industrial base. Next month, DoD will launch a competition to develop a new Institute for Manufacturing. But not just any manufacturing, in this case the work will have to involve photonics. The awardee will receive $110 million to jump start the institute. Adele Ratcliff is director of Manufacturing Technology in DoD's Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy. She joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss the objective of the new institute.

Friday - 10/24/2014, 10:05am EDT
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US troops to remain in South Korea longer

The U.S. has kept combat forces on the Korean Peninsula since the Korean War fighting halted on July 27, 1953, with the signing of an armistice. There are still about 28,000 American troops based in the South. However for years the U.S. has tried to reduce South Korea dependence on the American military by setting a target date for the transfer of authority.

Friday - 10/24/2014, 09:24am EDT

Marine Corps weeks away from beta testing BYOD approach

The Marine Corps will begin a small scale pilot in the next several weeks to determine whether commercial-grade security containers on mobile devices can meet DoD's security demands. If it's successful, Marines envision a BYOD strategy that begins implementation as soon as next year.

Friday - 10/24/2014, 04:01am EDT
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Supplies for Kurds go astray

The Pentagon acknowledged on Wednesday that two bundles of military supplies for Kurdish fighters in Kobani went astray during an air drop earlier this week, with one destroyed later by an air strike and the other taken by Islamic State militants.

Thursday - 10/23/2014, 10:25am EDT

Army changing its energy culture through better data

By the end of next year, the Army will install advanced electric meters at most of its large buildings, giving the service much more detailed data on how it uses energy than it's ever seen before.

Thursday - 10/23/2014, 03:58am EDT
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Jerry Hendrix, Defense Strategies and Assessments Program, CNAS

The Pentagon launched 12 airstrikes against the Islamic State militants in Iraq during the last 24 hours. As Operation Inherent Resolve continues -- and becomes more expensive -- it highlights a need to develop more cost efficient military strategies. Retired Navy Capt. Jerry Hendrix is former Director of Naval History. Hendrix is now senior fellow and director of the new Defense Strategies and Assessments Program at the Center for a New American Security. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he explained how the program will analyze and create new military strategies that emphasize cost effectiveness and innovation.

Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 04:11pm EDT
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US spending on ISIL growing

How much has the U.S. spent on the campaign against Islamic State Group?

Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 08:45am EDT

Army evolves its network integration process

The Army's network integration exercises will emphasize more lab testing and less integration during the NIE itself. Future NIEs will be biased toward programs of record, not off-the-shelf technologies.

Wednesday - 10/22/2014, 04:01am EDT
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Officials: Woman at Pentagon doesn't have Ebola

Health officials say woman reported sick at Pentagon parking lot doesn't have Ebola

Friday - 10/17/2014, 07:40pm EDT

Cautious responders at Pentagon transport ill woman to area hospital

Arlington County officials have transported an ill woman found Friday in a Pentagon parking lot to a local Virginia hospital. According to a DoD spokesperson, the woman told first responders she had recently traveled to Africa.

Friday - 10/17/2014, 01:09pm EDT

Report: Sequestration slashed DoD contract spending by 16 percent in 2013

Analysis by the Center for Strategic and International Studies shows R&D took the biggest hit, dropping by 21 percent in a single year. But payments to large firms and spending on large contracts got some degree of protection.

Friday - 10/17/2014, 08:32am EDT
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Mike Papay, Northrop Grumman, and Frank Cilluffo, GW University

Embedding cybersecurity into the Defense Department's design, manufacturing, and supply chain is a goal the Pentagon sees is possible. Mike Papay is Chief Information Security Officer and Vice President at Northrop Grumman, and Frank Cilluffo is director of the George Washington University Cybersecurity Initiative and the Homeland Security Policy Institute. On In Depth with Francis Rose, they offered steps the DoD can take to address the issue.

Thursday - 10/16/2014, 04:28pm EDT
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Andrew Hunter, Director, Joint Rapid Acquisition Cell

The Defense Department's Joint Rapid Acquisition Cell is responsible for coordinating the department's effort to fill its crucial and often unanticipated operational needs. These are requirements combatant commanders and warfighters often discover they need after yearly budgets have been set. As part of our special report, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, Tom Temin spoke with Andrew Hunter, director of the cell, on the Federal Drive. He explained how rapid acquisition works.

Thursday - 10/16/2014, 12:00pm EDT
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Jared Serbu, DoD Reporter, Federal News Radio

Congress has repeatedly tried to eliminate the problem of defense acquisition programs that cost more than they're supposed to and take too long to deliver. After several decades of attempts, it might be time to admit that lawmakers can't solve all of the Pentagon's purchasing problems. As part of our special report, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, Federal News Radio's Jared Serbu explains.

Thursday - 10/16/2014, 10:15am EDT
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After decades of DoD acquisition reform, Congress has yet to tackle cultural issues

Big programs at DoD continue to overspend their budgets and blow past their schedules because of unrealistic requirements and rosy cost projections. As part of our special report, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, several acquisition experts pointed out that DoD acquisition is one of the most studied problems in the history of government.

Thursday - 10/16/2014, 04:52am EDT
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Odierno: Global strategy helps Army balance readiness, threat response

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno says new Army Operating Concept stresses flexibility and sustainability to combat a wide variety of enemies across a wide swath of domains.

Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 12:56pm EDT
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Army looking past push-ups, math scores to fill its future ranks

For now, push-ups and math scores are the main methods the Army uses to screen potential recruits. But officials say they are studying measures that take a "whole person" approach identifying future soldiers.

Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 07:20am EDT

31 ideas for reforming DoD contracting

The U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations asked 31 acquisition experts to weigh in on how the Defense acquisition process can be reformed. Federal News Radio brings you some of the highlights.

Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 04:43am EDT

Successful DoD acquisition programs start with funding for the workforce

The success of defense acquisition will always depend on the capability of a limited number of people inside and outside government whose resources of time and attention are finite. Increased skill, relevant experiences, and cultural adjustment of the workforce will occur only gradually and only with adequate funding and congressional oversight, says contracting expert Jonathan Etherton.

Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 02:29am EDT

Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army

Only a few weeks ago, Army leadership was planning to shrink its force to levels unseen since before World War II. But that was before Islamic State terrorists threatened to take over Iraq and Syria, before Russia invaded Ukraine and before the U.S. began deploying 4,000 troops to West Africa to help control the Ebola outbreak. Now the Army's Chief of Staff, Gen. Ray Odierno, suggests the Army and political leaders need to rethink their plans. He spoke with Emily Kopp at the Association of the Army Expo about the Army's next steps.

Tuesday - 10/14/2014, 01:01pm EDT
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