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'Mentoring is an interpersonal process,' expert says

Cary Kemp Larson, an organizational psychologist who helped develop a new mentoring program at the National Science Foundation, talks to The Federal Drive with Tom Temin and Emily Kopp about successful mentoring.

Tags: Cary Kemp Larson , mentoring , workforce , training , Federal Drive , management

Thursday - 04/19/2012, 10:50am EDT
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Lockheed Martin applies space experience to Antarctic work

The Science Foundation has just awarded a $2 billion contract to Lockheed Martin for infrastructure and technological support for the mission in Antarctica.

Tags: Rick Hieb , Lockheed Martin , technology , Antarctica

Tuesday - 01/03/2012, 10:15am EST
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Smart phones vulnerable to rootkit attacks

And the U.S. would lose a cyberwar if it fought one today, according to a former US intel chief.

Tags: Cybersecurity Update , cybersecurity , smartphones , Army ,

Wednesday - 02/24/2010, 09:05am EST

IGs: promoting effectiveness and efficiency in the federal government

Host Bill Bransford is joined by Tom Caulfield, executive director of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency, and National Science Foundation Inspector General Allison Lerner.
July 8, 2011

Tags: pay and benefits , efficiency in government , Government Audit , Bill Bransford , tom caulfield , council of the inspectors general on integrity and , allison lerner , Fed Talk

Friday - 07/08/2011, 07:07pm EDT
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Stretching Molecules Yields New Understanding of Electricity

Cornell University researchers recently stretched individual molecules and watched electrons flow through them, proving that single-molecule devices can be used as powerful new tools for nanoscale science experiments. The work resulted in the first precision tests of a phenomenon known as the under screened Kondo effect. It shows that single-molecule devices can be very useful as scientific tools to study a phenomenon that has never before been accessible. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation's Division of Materials Research and presents a powerful new tool for nanoscale science experiments. Using a cobalt-based complex cooled to extremely low temperatures, Ralph, Parks and an international team of researchers watched electrons move through single molecules and accomplished a feat that until now escaped chemists and physicists. They were able to study the resistance of the flow of electricity within a system's electric field as the temperature approached absolute zero.

Tags: technology , Meeting Mission Goals Through Technology , Cornell University , Ralph Parks , science , Scott Carr

Thursday - 06/17/2010, 01:20pm EDT