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6:50 am, October 22, 2014

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Paraffin Used to Make Lower Cost Batteries

A little wax and soap will help build electrodes for cheaper lithium ion batteries. According to a study in an August issue of Nano Letters, a new one-step method will allow battery developers to explore lower-priced alternatives to popular lithium ion-metal oxide batteries. Consumers use them in everything from cell phones to toothbrushes, and they're being tried in automobiles. But, most lithium ion batteries available today are designed with an OXIDE of metal such as cobalt, nickel, or manganese which are relatively heavy and expensive. Scientists with the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Lab have been experimenting with cheaper metals and the more stable phosphate in place of oxide. Researchers say, paraffin can provide a good medium in which to grow lighter, cheaper electrode materials.

Tags: technology , Meeting Mission Goals Through Technology Report , Scott Carr

Monday - 08/30/2010, 07:29pm EDT

Software Rapidly Detects Water Contamination

Scientists with the Environmental Protection Agency have collaborated with the Department of Energy to develop new water quality software that enhances a local water system's ability to know when it's been intentionally, or unintentionally, contaminated. It assists both agencies in meeting goals connected to homeland security. Utilities can use the Canary software - in conjunction with a network of sensors - to quickly detect contamination, more accurately assess when and how to respond, and then issue warnings to customers if necessary. The software can help detect chemical and biological contaminants, including pesticides, metals, and pathogens. Canary is available worldwide as a free software tool to drinking water utilities. The software is currently being used by more than 600 users in 15 countries.

Tags: technology , Meeting Mission Goals Through Technology Report , EPA , Scott Carr

Monday - 08/30/2010, 07:26pm EDT

Weakest link in federal hiring is at the start

In federal hiring, officials always have to strike a balance: fill the job as quickly as possible, while looking for the right candidate from as big a pool of applicants as possible. A new report suggests evaluating candidates is the weakest part of the entire hiring process.

Tags: management , pay and benefits , OPM , hiring reforms , Partnership for Public Service , Joshua Joseph , NIH , Christine Majors , Brian Costlow , ODNI , Elizabeth Kolmstetter , employee assessments , Max Cacas

Friday - 08/27/2010, 07:39am EDT
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DOE and Dod Accelerate Their Use of Clean

The Department of Energy has entered into an agreement with the Department of Defense to accelerate the development of clean energy technologies while enhancing national energy security. A Memorandum of Understanding between the agencies now covers energy efficiency and renewable energy. It calls for their collaboration on the use of alternative fuels, efficient transportation technologies and fueling infrastructure, grid security, use of the smart grid, energy storage, basic science research, and mobile/deployable power sources. It builds on existing cooperation between the Departments, and will broaden collaboration on clean energy technology research, development, and demonstration. The Defense Department aims to speed up the transfer of innovative energy and conservation technologies from the lab to use in the field. To that end, military installations are used as testing sites before such energy technologies are actually brought to the marketplace.

Tags: technology , Meeting Mission Goals Through Technology , DoD , Scott Carr

Monday - 08/09/2010, 02:43pm EDT

Gasification Website Is Launched

A new public website has been launched by the Department of Energy designed to promote a better understanding of gasification technology - an increasingly popular alternative to converting feedstocks like coal and biomass into useful products such as electricity or fuels. Officials say gasification is anticipated to be the technology of choice for future near zero-emissions, coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and chemicals. The process uses heat, pressure, and steam to convert ANY carbon-based raw material into synthesized gas, which can then be refined into pure hydrogen, transformed into liquid transportation fuels, or used to create electricity. The website - dubbed Gasifipedia - contains both introductory and in-depth information. You'll find the new Gasifipedia through the department's Energy Lab website at www.netl.doe.gov.

Tags: technology , Meeting Mission Goals Through Technology , Scott Carr

Monday - 08/09/2010, 02:25pm EDT

CO2 Injection Project

The Department of Energy and Natural Resources Canada will spend a total of $5.2 million dollars to bring a benchmark carbon dioxide injection project to a successful conclusion next year. The two governments will renew funding for the a CO2 Monitoring and Storage project. Under the project, carbon dioxide taken from a Gasification synfuels plant in North Dakota is delivered - via a 200-mile pipeline - to Canadian oil fields where the gas is injected roughly five-thousand feet underground. The gas forces oil into wells where it can be harvested, nearly tripling oil production. The project reduces greenhouse gas emissions while also demonstrating clean energy innovation. A projected total of 40 million tons of CO2 will be stored - and over 200 million additional barrels of oil are expected to be recovered - through the project by the year 2035.

Tags: technology , Meeting Mission Goals Through Technology , Scott Carr

Monday - 08/09/2010, 02:24pm EDT

Viruses found embedded in smartphone apps

DOE raises concern over safety of electric grid

Tags: Federal Drive , Google , smartphones , cybersecurity , Cybersecurity Update

Tuesday - 08/03/2010, 08:30am EDT

Architecting Defense-in-Detail

August 11th at 11:05am

The DoD GIG IA Portfolio Management Office (GIAP) has learned through experience that mission critical networks are contested, violated, infiltrated and penetrated, leading to significant risks to US interests. The U.S. critical infrastructure has evolved from a ‘network enabled' position to one that is now ‘network dependent.' No aspect of the national critical infrastructure operates without extensive use of information technology, and it is this very fact that makes our networks such a high priority target for adversaries.

The need for secure, self-aware, proactively managed defense mechanisms has never been more critical. Commercially available technologies, when combined with research and development done by both the government and the private sector, represent the best possible approach for combating the types of threats our critical infrastructure is facing today.

Tags: technology , CA Technologies , Dynamic Cybersecurity , cybersecurity , Tim Brown , security , Robert Brese , Gary Galloway , State

Monday - 08/02/2010, 12:34pm EDT
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Energy hopes green roofs spread like weeds

What's white and green and efficient all over? DOE hopes it's your roof.

Tags: Federal Drive , green roof , Jen Stutsman , technology , management , cool roofs , Green government , Steven Chu , NNSA , Rachel Stevens

Tuesday - 07/27/2010, 10:31am EDT
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Document classification system under review

In the government, it's said that nothing has more endurance, or lasts longer than a document stamped "top secret". A presidential advisory panel tasked with developing a newly streamlined classification and declassification system for the government wrestled with one proposal to get rid of one existing category all together.

Tags: national security , Public Interest Declassification Board , DoD , Andrew Weston-Dawkes , Steven Aftergood , Federation of American Scientists , Barack Obama , Max Cacas

Monday - 07/26/2010, 06:45am EDT
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