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Should we be worried about a cyber war?

Seymour Hersh writes in the New Yorker about the EP-3E debacle that has fueled a debate on whether the military or civilians should take the lead in cybersecurity.

Tags: Seymour Hersh , New Yorker , cybersecurity , technology , China , EP-3E , Must Reads , Dorobek Insider , NSA ,

Tuesday - 10/26/2010, 02:26pm EDT

DorobekINSIDER: It’s officially official: Takai named DOD CIO

In a town that has become accustom to long and tangled appointments, this one may go down in the books, but it is officially official this morning: Defense Secretary Robert Gates named Teri Takai to be the Defense Department’s chief information officer, ostensibly replacing John Grimes, who retired in April 2009. Takai will start her [...]

Tags: CIOs , management , policy , technology

Tuesday - 10/26/2010, 10:08am EDT

DorobekINSIDER: It’s officially official: Takai named DOD CIO

In a town that has become accustom to long and tangled appointments, this one may go down in the books, but it is officially official this morning: Defense Secretary Robert Gates named Teri Takai to be the Defense Department’s chief information officer, ostensibly replacing John Grimes, who retired in April 2009. Takai is widely respected [...]

Tags: CIOs , management , policy , technology

Tuesday - 10/26/2010, 10:08am EDT

U.S. and S. Korean drills canceled

Did the cancellation of joint military exercises between the U.S. and S. Korea in the Yellow Sea have anything to do with China. Not according to the Pentagon. A spokesman said the two navies couldn't agree on a timetable. He also said the exercises in international water should pose no problems for neither China nor North Korea The South Korean media reported the drills had been cancelled because of complaints from China.

Tags: Pentagon & Beyond , Pentagon , J.J. Green

Monday - 10/25/2010, 06:39pm EDT

New Wikileaks release puts Iraqis at risk

A team of experts has been pouring over the latest release of documents from wiki leaks. Pentagon spokesman Dave Lapan said they didn't reveal anything that hadn't already been reported. Most of the material dealt with tactical intelligence and unit level reporting of events and incidents that took place during the Iraq War. What the Pentagon has said is that Iraqis whose names that do appear in the documents are understandably at risk.

Tags: Pentagon & Beyond , Pentagon , J.J. Green

Monday - 10/25/2010, 05:43pm EDT

To Improve Cybersecurity the Federal Government Must Enhance Its Partnership with the Private Sector

Cybersecurity is a shared responsibility. During National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, the Administration has educated the general public about the evolving risk of cyber threats through its "Stop. Think. Connect." campaign and reminded the American people, government agencies, and industry that everyone has a role to play in guarding against cyber attacks. At the same time, Administration officials have leveraged the momentum of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month to announce changes in government organizational relationships designed to enhance the security of federal information assets and networks in cyberspace, such as the Memorandum of Agreement between the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) formalizing agency roles and responsibilities for coordinating cybersecurity. One area that has received less public attention is the need for government to enhance its partnership with the private sector.

Building this partnership and clarifying these roles and responsibilities is critical. The private sector's resources are inextricably linked to our government's efforts to successfully secure federal information in cyberspace for several key reasons, most notably:

  • Much of the nation's cyber infrastructure is owned and operated by the private sector. Because the public, government, educational institutions, and industry rely on cyberspace, an attack against a major player in the Information Technology (IT) infrastructure sector may not be just an attack against a company. Instead, it may result in an attack against the Internet itself and may impact citizens, governments, and companies across the globe. The federal cybersecurity community must clarify the degree to which government and industry should partner to prevent, detect, and defend against these challenges
  • Each key sector of the nation's Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) leverages cyberspace to perform mission-critical tasks.Cyberspace minimizes and, in some instances, eliminates jurisdictional, organizational, and technical boundaries of CIKR sectors (e.g., emergency services, defense industrial base, communications, government facilities, etc.). While the increased capability to share information across sectors enables private sector and government CIKR stakeholders to perform more efficiently and effectively, it also creates additional vulnerabilities in cyberspace. In order to truly be prepared to meet the challenges posed by cyber attacks that could threaten the security of multiple CIKR sectors, the federal government must enhance its partnership with private sector CIKR stakeholders
  • There is a shortage of cybersecurity talent in government. While the Cyberspace Policy Review included the need to expand and train its workforce as a key priority, and efforts are underway toward that end, the reality is…the government can't do it alone. Cyber attacks are a constantly evolving, significant threat to our national security and the federal government. In the short-term, the federal government has an immediate need for a qualified, seasoned cybersecurity workforce (e.g., Information System Security Officers (ISSO), cyber strategists, security operations specialists, and program managers, etc.) and must fill these gaps by augmenting its existing workforce with the resources available in the private sector. Long-term, the federal government must assess its broader cyber workforce strategy and the role that the private sector plays in meeting mission-critical cyber requirements
As September came to a close, DHS hosted Cyber Storm III- an exercise designed to test the government's cyber preparedness, which included participants from throughout the federal government, 11 states, 12 international partners, and 60 private sector companies. Cyber Storm III provided the opportunity to test the updated National Cyber Incident Response Plan (Interim Version, September 2010), including the roles and responsibilities of the private sector in cyber incident management. With more than 20 additional private sector participants than its preceding exercise, it also provided an unprecedented opportunity for government and the private sector to work together to solve a (fictional) cyber threat scenario. We look forward to viewing the exercise's after-action report and the recommendations for government to enhance its partnership with the private sector in the cybersecurity arena.

Tags: technology , KCG's Trusted Advisor Center , cyber , cybersecurity , DHS

Monday - 10/25/2010, 05:27pm EDT

Navy sets course for agile IT development

Across the government, chief information officers are being asked to modernize technology systems more quickly and in smaller, more modular programs -- and for less money. But what happens when your network is on a moving ship?

Tags: technology , Navy , David Weddel , Charles Smith , James Syring , AFCEA D.C. , software development , agile development , Max Cacas

Monday - 10/25/2010, 09:37am EDT
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MDA fails to shoot down missile

The military's Missile Defense Agency plan to shoot down a fake ballistic missile of the coast of Central California was not successful. The objective of the mission was for the ALTB to destroy a solid-fuel, short-range ballistic missile while its rocket motors were still thrusting. A news release from the agency says, the Terrier Black Brant target missile was launched successfully, the system acquired and tracked the target, but never transitioned to active tracking.

Tags: Pentagon & Beyond , Pentagon , J.J. Green

Friday - 10/22/2010, 01:18am EDT

Attacks on Al Qaida intensifying

The government of Yemen is trying to put down a branch of al Qaida that has attacked Western and regional targets in the country next to oil giant Saudi Arabia. So Yemeni authorities offer a reward of $50,000 for information on the whereabouts of two Saudi "terrorists", Turki al-Shahrani and Ahmed al-Jasser. Yemeni aircraft bombed al Qaeda positions in southern Yemen.

Tags: Pentagon & Beyond , Pentagon , J.J. Green

Friday - 10/22/2010, 01:17am EDT

Pentagon looking at gunfire detection system

"Shot spotter" is being considered for use at the Pentagon specifically to help in situations like the one that unfolded yesterday. "Two exterior windows had been hit by gunfire," says Pentagon Force Protection director Steven Calvery. Shot spotter is a gunfire location and detection tool that uses acoustic sensors to determine where gunshots came from, when they were fired and it can even determine whether an automatic weapon was used.

Tags: Pentagon & Beyond , Pentagon , J.J. Green

Friday - 10/22/2010, 01:15am EDT
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