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11:00 am, April 21, 2015

NSA News

DoD breaks mobile security roadblock

The Defense Department is in the final stages of a test to show how derived credentials from the Common Access Card can secure smartphones and tablet computers. Richard Hale, the deputy CIO for cybersecurity, boldly predicts that by the end of the calendar year the military will be issuing derived credentials on mobile devices.

Friday - 04/03/2015, 04:35am EDT
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Dress-wearing man killed by NSA police had lengthy record

Dress-wearing man killed at spy agency gate after stealing car had lengthy criminal record

Tuesday - 03/31/2015, 11:42pm EDT

Latest on NSA shooting: Driver refused orders to stop

Latest on NSA shooting: Driver failed to follow orders for safely leaving restricted area

Tuesday - 03/31/2015, 09:46am EDT

US official: Reports say 1 dead at Fort Meade gate crashing

One person was killed in a firefight that erupted Monday after a car with two people tried to ram a gate at the Fort Meade, Md., military base near a gate to the National Security Agency

Monday - 03/30/2015, 11:46am EDT

O'Keefe: Budget is DHS' biggest data challenge

Several components of the Homeland Security Department are searching for new ways to fund big data projects. Budget pressures are forcing them to get creative, so they're relying on unique IT initiatives to meet their mission. Tom O'Keefe is market intelligence senior analyst at Immix Group. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he shared details on some of the most promising initiatives scattered throughout DHS.

Monday - 03/09/2015, 04:33pm EDT
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Linda Burger, Technology Transfer Program, Joseph Witt, NSA

Niagarafiles is a new information sharing program from the National Security Agency. But it's not classified, and it's not even the NSA's anymore. The agency has made it open-source so anyone can use it, or change it. It's part of the NSA's Technology Transfer Program. Linda Burger is director of the Technology Transfer Program at the National Security Agency, and Joseph Witt is development lead at NSA. On In Depth with Francis Rose, Linda said NSA isn't new to the open-source concept.

Monday - 03/09/2015, 04:11pm EDT
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Snowden leak: NSA helped British steal cell phone codes

Latest Snowden leak: NSA helped British spies hack Dutch company to break into mobile phones

Monday - 02/23/2015, 09:50am EST

Sharon Bradford Franklin, Executive Director, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

Its original intention was ostensibly to help protect the U.S. from terrorist threats. But Edward Snowden's reveal of the extent of the National Security Agency's bulk telephone records program planted seeds of doubt in many minds. Records indicate the NSA was even monitoring domestic calls. Sharon Bradford Franklin is the executive director of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board. She joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with more on the bulk data collection program, and whether it should even continue.

Friday - 02/06/2015, 09:09am EST
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Michael Leiter, Executive Vice President for Strategy and Business Development, Leidos

It may be unpopular, but bulk data collection by the National Security Agency is effective. Technology can't replicate what bulk data collection can do for intelligence. But more effective methods could be developed so that the collection and use of data is more targeted and controlled. Those are among the findings from a major study of signal intelligence practices. The study was just completed by the National Academies. It was requested by the President and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence a year ago. Michael Leiter is an executive vice president at Leidos and a member of the committee that authored the report. He joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss the findings.

Wednesday - 01/21/2015, 10:45am EST
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Richard Stiennon, Founder, IT Harvest

Adm. Mike Rogers, commander of the U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency, told the House Intelligence Committee that China, and perhaps other countries, will be able to shut down and damage critical infrastructure in the United States by 2025. Richard Stiennon is executive editor of the Security Current blog and founder of IT Harvest. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he said only one part of Rogers' comment seems off the mark.

Wednesday - 12/03/2014, 04:28pm EST
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Chris Cummiskey, Former Acting Undersecretary for Management, DHS

A major cyberattack on the nation's critical infrastructure will happen in the next 10 years, says Adm. Michael Rogers, director of the National Security Agency. He tells the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence the only way to handle the threat is to have a true partnership among the public sector, the private sector and academia. Chris Cummiskey is former acting undersecretary for management at the Homeland Security Department. He shared how to do that on In Depth with Francis Rose.

Tuesday - 11/25/2014, 04:56pm EST
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DoD migrating to NSA-managed process for mobile device security approvals

The Defense Department is making some significant changes in the processes it uses to make sure commercial mobile technologies are safe enough for military networks, migrating from a process that's been largely managed by the Defense Information Systems Agency to one that relies more on private laboratories and is coordinated by the National Security Agency.

Monday - 11/10/2014, 03:57am EST

Inside the DoD Reporter's Notebook: Reservations over DoD's joint security infrastructure; Navy command leaving D.C; DISA embrac

In this edition of "Inside the DoD's Reporter's Notebook," reservations over DoD's joint security infrastructure; Navy command leaving D.C; DISA embraces NIAP for mobile.

Monday - 11/10/2014, 03:54am EST

NSA's mobility mission office puts itself out of business

The National Security Agency closed down an office dedicated to mobility, because devices and apps have become part of the fabric of everything the agency does. But NSA, like all agencies, still must figure out how to secure mobile devices using derived credentials.

Thursday - 08/21/2014, 04:53am EDT
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Danielle Kehl, Policy Analyst, Open Technology Institute

It's been more than a year since Edward Snowden first leaked news of the National Security Agency's collecting metadata on Americans. While the jury is still out on whether Snowden is hero or villain, one thing is clear: The episode has changed how Americans see the NSA and the technology companies that help it gather information. A new report from the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation aims to tally the costs to both federal agencies and contractors. Policy Analyst Danielle Kehl joined Emily Kopp on the Federal Drive with details.

Tuesday - 08/12/2014, 02:21am EDT
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Steve LaFountain, National Security Agency

This fall, five more schools will offer an intensive science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education track to students who are serious about federal cybersecurity careers. These Centers of Academic Excellence are overseen jointly by the National Security Agency and the Homeland Security Department. Schools have to pass a meticulous screening process to qualify for the program. Steve LaFountain is dean of the NSA's College of Cyber. He joined Tom Temin and Emily Kopp on the Federal Drive to discuss the new move.

Thursday - 07/31/2014, 08:52am EDT
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Collateral damage of Snowden leaks being felt in cyber, public trust

Chief legal counselor to NSA says intelligence disclosures may have set back efforts to improve nation's cybersecurity posture because of increasing unease about public-private cooperation, and that it's time to reexamine the digital privacy trust relationship between government and the public.

Monday - 07/28/2014, 04:49am EDT
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Why is Russian President Putin at odds with the rest of the world?

"The President of Russia now has a view of history since 1945 that is completely at odds with how the rest of the world looks at history," says Former National Security Advisor James Jones. The real issue, which many view as a festering problem, is Putin's alleged grudge about the way the Cold War turned out. "He believes and he has said that worst thing that has happened in the last century is the dissolution of the Soviet Empire," says Jones.

Tuesday - 07/22/2014, 08:45am EDT

Bill Lynn, CEO, Finmeccanica North America

The first change of command at U.S. Cyber Command is complete. General Keith Alexander made way for Admiral Mike Rogers recently. But new revelations from Edward Snowden are a reminder that the first four years of the combination of CYBERCOM and the National Security Agency aren't without controversy. William Lynn was Deputy Secretary of Defense when the Defense Department stood up Cyber Command. He wrote about the strategy behind it in Foreign Policy at the time. He is now Chief Executive Officer of Finmeccanica North America and DRS Technologies. He explained on In Depth with Francis Rose the chain of events that caused DoD leadership to stand up Cyber Command.

Tuesday - 07/08/2014, 05:29pm EDT
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Sharon Bradford Franklin, Executive Director, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

The National Security Agency's collection of Internet data may be massive, but it's constitutional. An independent agency, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, has released a thorough report on how federal agencies track foreigners' communications under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The law has come under fire since Edward Snowden leaked documents on NSA programs a year ago. Sharon Bradford Franklin, executive director of the PCLOB, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to talk about the board's investigation.

Thursday - 07/03/2014, 10:06am EDT
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