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2:02 pm, November 26, 2014

Federal Drive

Monday - Friday, 6-9 a.m.

Host Tom Temin brings you the latest news affecting the federal community each weekday morning, featuring interviews with top government executives and contractors. Listen live from 6 to 9 a.m. or download archived interviews below.

Thursday - 10/16/2014, 09:40am EDT
Kelvin Wood, Director, Treasury Acquisition Institute

The Treasury Acquisition Institute has experienced a nearly 20 percent increase in the number of federal employees it trains each year. The appetite for training is going to keep growing, forcing TAI to rethink how it delivers workforce education. As part of our special report, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, today we'll focus on taking stock for the future. Institute Director Kelvin Wood tells Executive Editor Jason Miller how TAI is changing with the times.

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Thursday - 10/16/2014, 09:21am EDT
Thursday federal headlines - October 16, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, federal government ramps up its response to Ebola, the Health and Human Services Department looks to industry for an Ebola vaccine and the federal budget deficit reaches its lowest point in six years.

Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 08:36am EDT
Wednesday federal headlines - October 15, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, President Obama says he won't nominate a new attorney general until after mid-term elections, the CDC chief says he wishes he'd acted faster to fight Ebola and VA executive Susan Taylor retires before she could be fired.

Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 08:29am EDT
Jason Miller, Executive Editor, Federal News Radio

The ever-evolving training regime for federal acquisition workers is no longer about the hard skills of acquisition only. Acquisition people certainly do need to know the policies, regulations and laws. But for real improvement to take place in the system, they also need soft skills to lead successful procurements. As part of our special report, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, Federal News Radio's Executive Editor Jason Miller explores the changing nature of acquisition workforce training.

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Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 02:37am EDT
Frank Anderson, Former President of Defense Acquisition University

Former Defense Acquisition University President Frank Anderson is a veteran when it comes to the theme of procurement reform and people. Anderson says the acquisition workforce in the Defense Department has come a long way. He joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss how procurement leadership can foster better outcomes.

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Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 02:30am EDT
Jim Williams, Partner, Schambach & Williams Consulting

On the second day of our three-day series, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, we're focusing on people and what improvements can be made to acquisition training and the workforce. Jim Williams is former acting commissioner at the General Services Administration and the top acquisition official at the IRS. Williams joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss all things procurement and the current state of governmentwide acquisition vehicles.

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Wednesday - 10/15/2014, 02:20am EDT
Dan Gordon, George Washington University Law School

As part of our special report, The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, we examine bid and contract award protests. In the grand scheme of things 1,600 protests don't amount to much stacked next to the one or two million contract actions each year. Former Office of Federal Procurement Policy Administrator Dan Gordon joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to share his perspective.

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Tuesday - 10/14/2014, 01:11pm EDT
Lt. Gen. Michael E. Williamson, U.S. Army

Sometimes you have a plan but contingencies come up and force you to change. That's the situation the Army finds itself in. The service is taking a close look at how budget constraints and blossoming global conflicts are forcing it to adjust. Army Lt. Gen. Michael Williamson is military deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology and director of Acquisition Career Management. He spoke with Emily Kopp at the Association of the U.S. Army Expo.

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Tuesday - 10/14/2014, 01:05pm EDT
Bill Greenwalt, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute

Today is the first of a three-day series here at Federal News Radio called The Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform. Today's focus is legislating reform. Over the years, what statutes have made the most impact, what have been the least successful and what pending legislation holds the most promise? The Clinger-Cohen act changed the landscape of federal procurement back in 1996. It gave agencies more authority and formalized the CIO position. Bill Greenwalt is a former Senate staff member who helped pen Clinger-Cohen, formally known as the Information Technology Management Reform Act. He's now a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. Greenwalt joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to explain why the Clinger-Cohen act was needed to update the prevailing law at the time.

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Tuesday - 10/14/2014, 01:01pm EDT
Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army

Only a few weeks ago, Army leadership was planning to shrink its force to levels unseen since before World War II. But that was before Islamic State terrorists threatened to take over Iraq and Syria, before Russia invaded Ukraine and before the U.S. began deploying 4,000 troops to West Africa to help control the Ebola outbreak. Now the Army's Chief of Staff, Gen. Ray Odierno, suggests the Army and political leaders need to rethink their plans. He spoke with Emily Kopp at the Association of the Army Expo about the Army's next steps.

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Tuesday - 10/14/2014, 08:30am EDT
Tuesday federal headlines - October 14, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, the State Department is concerned about the planned sale of New York's Waldorf Astoria hotel to a Chinese insurance company, the NIH director blames budget cuts on lack of Ebola vaccine and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel repeats warning that climate change poses a threat to militaries around the world.

Monday - 10/13/2014, 03:32pm EDT
Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection

You might say Customs and Border Protection had a busy summer. The agency had to deal with a surge of unaccompanied minors. Tens of thousands of them flooded across the Mexican border. CBP handled all it with limited funding. It also faced claims that agents used excessive force at detention centers and against people trying to cross into the United States illegally. Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss the next steps.

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Monday - 10/13/2014, 09:13am EDT
Jason Miller, Executive Editor, Federal News Radio

Agencies are struggling to follow the rules around cloud computing. The Council of Inspectors General examined 77 commercial cloud contracts across 19 civilian agencies. It found most failed to implement federal guidance and best practices. Federal News Radio's Jason Miller joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with details on the councils' new report.

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Monday - 10/13/2014, 08:26am EDT
Monday federal headlines - October 13, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, the State Department gets rid of transgender exclusion from its largest health program, U.S. and coalition forces gain access to a Turkish base near Syria, and the Army War College revokes Sen. John Walsh's (D-Mont.) master's degree thesis.

Sunday - 10/12/2014, 09:38pm EDT
Trey Hodgkins, Information Technology Industry Council

Contractors are casting a wary eye on President Barack Obama's Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces executive order. It seems innocuous because most contractors already comply with labor laws. Still, the EO could cause a lot of mischief. Trey Hodgkins, senior vice president of the Public Sector at the Information Technology Industry Council, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss how the EO affects contractors.

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Sunday - 10/12/2014, 09:34pm EDT
Miguel Garrido, Quantitative Analyst, Bloomberg Government

Big changes are coming to one corner of the General Services Administration in January. GSA's Federal Acquisition Service plans to overhaul its professional contracts by consolidating several multiple award contracts into one big schedule. The new vehicle could generate more than $5 billion in sales. Miguel Garrido, quantitative analyst for Bloomberg Government, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with details.

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Friday - 10/10/2014, 10:24am EDT
Friday federal headlines - October 10, 2014

The Federal Headlines is a daily compilation of the stories you hear discussed on Federal News Radio each day. It is designed to give FederalNewsRadio.com readers more information about the stories heard on the radio. In today's news, Ebola aid money gets stalled in Congress, VA breaks records in processing disability and pension claims and the Pentagon wants to station American aircraft at a Turkish air base near the Syrian border.

Friday - 10/10/2014, 10:23am EDT
Ted Pestorius, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Ebola outbreak has forced the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention into overdrive. About 100 staff members are in West Africa. Hundreds of other employees are working at the agency's emergency operations center in Atlanta. Still more are working stateside to protect Americans from Ebola or just picking up extra work so their colleagues can focus on the disease. Ted Pestorius is a management officer for the CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, where his focus is on the center's employees. Emily Kopp caught up with him at NIH this week, at a conference where he was speaking about ways supervisors can support their employees. She asked Pestorius how is the CDC supporting these employees, and what concerns he hears the most about their well-being?

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Friday - 10/10/2014, 05:34am EDT
Jason Miller, Executive Editor, Federal News Radio

The White House still holds out hope for comprehensive cybersecurity legislation from Congress, but not a lot of hope. Instead, the administration's more likely expectation is a series of smaller bills that address challenges everyone can agree on. Federal News Radio's Executive Editor Jason Miller joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss the White House's new approach.

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Thursday - 10/09/2014, 04:44pm EDT
Dr. Steven Simon, National Cancer Institute

The first atomic explosion took place seven decades ago, but there's still fallout. The National Cancer Institute has embarked on a new study to examine cancer risks from that early detonation. Researchers want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may have been induced by the explosion called Trinity. Dr. Steven Simon, head of Dosimetry Unit of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with details.

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