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9:39 am, October 25, 2014

Pentagon & Beyond

National Security Correspondent J.J. Green has traveled three continents covering intelligence, terrorism, and security issues. From Afghanistan to Africa, Iraq to Ireland, there isn't anywhere J.J. won't go, nor anyone he won't talk with, to get the stories affecting the defense and national security communities.

Bergdahl arrives in the US

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl left Landstuhl Hospital in Ramstein, Germany late Thursday and he's being processed into Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) in San Antonio, Texas. Brooke is the flagship of Army medicine and is a level one trauma center. It is comprised of ten separate organizations that provide both inpatient care outpatient care. The hospital is a 450-bed facility which is expandable to 653 beds in the event of a disaster. Bergdahl was held by the Taliban for 5 years.

How did the Blackwater shootings happen?

It was September 16, 2007. A Blackwater personal security detail was clearing the way for a convoy of State Department diplomats. The shootings supposedly started after the driver of a car kept driving toward the convoy ignoring orders to stop. When the shooting was over, 14 Iraqis were dead and 18 were wounded. A trial is underway in Washington for Blackwater security guards involved in the shooting.

CIA disciplines employees

The Associated Press reports it has obtained a document indicating 15 CIA employees were disciplined for committing sexual, racial or other types of harassment last year. That included a supervisor who was removed from the job after engaging in bullying and hostile behavior, as well as an operative who was sent home from an overseas post for inappropriately touching female colleagues. The agency says there is zero tolerance for that type of behavior in the agency's workforce.

Blackwater guards facing trial

After long delays, four former guards from the security firm Blackwater Worldwide are going to trial for the killings of 14 Iraqi civilians and the wounding of 18 others that fueled anti-American sentiment around the world. Associated Press reporter Pete Yost writes, "whether the shootings were self-defense or an unprovoked attack, the carnage of Sept. 16, 2007, was seen by critics of the George W. Bush administration as an illustration of a war gone horribly wrong."

Clinton fires back

Former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton defended her response to the deadly 2012 terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, writing in her new book that she will "not be part of a political slugfest on the backs of dead Americans." She continues, "Those who exploit this tragedy over and over as a political tool minimize the sacrifice of those who served our country."

Hagel visits Singapore

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel met in Singapore late last week with that nation's defense minister, Dr. Ng Eng Hen. The two met on the sidelines of the annual Shangri-La Dialogue, a major annual forum for key leaders in the Asia-Pacific region to discuss security challenges and opportunities. Hagel thanked Ng for his strong support of the relationship the two militaries continue to enjoy. They also discussed a range of regional security issues, to include tensions in the South and East China seas, recent events in Thailand, defense reforms in Japan, and the need for a continued focus on dialogue, cooperation and the peaceful resolution of disputes in the region.

Boko Haram strikes again

The terror group that kidnapped 276 schoolgirls last month gunned down a traditional Muslim emir in an attack on a convoy in northeastern Nigeria on Friday, according to the government in Borno state. The Emir of Gwoza, Alhaji Idrissa Timta, was travelling with the Emirs of Uba and Askira to a attend a funeral when the suspected Islamist gunmen opened fire on their car in Zhura, a remote community in Borno state.

The US worried about violence in Ukraine

The Obama administration is expressing new concerns about rising violence in eastern Ukraine, including the downing of a military helicopter by pro-Russian rebels battling the government. The White House on Thursday called on Russia to exert pressure on the separatists to get them to end the fighting and release international monitors detained in eastern Ukraine since earlier this week.

Obama unveils new counter-terrorism effort

Counter-terrorism is a key tenet of President Barack Obama's foreign policy plan going forward. He said in a speech at West Point on Wednesday, "the most direct threat to America at home and abroad remains terrorism. But a strategy that involves invading every country that harbors terrorist networks is na´ve and unsustainable." His plan is to advise and assist countries facing significant terrorism threats and help build the capacity to deal with threats on their own.

Afghanistan drawdown announced

President Barack Obama has announced that 9800 troops will be left behind next year when all combat troops pull out of Afghanistan. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said in a statement, "I strongly support the president's decision to maintain a limited U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan after our combat mission ends there later this year." Hagel said the move will do two things: "it will help ensure that al-Qaida cannot reconstitute itself in Afghanistan, and it will help us sustain the significant progress we have made in training and equipping the Afghan national security forces."

White House holds meeting on foreign policy

White House officials held private meetings last week aimed at soothing lawmakers' concerns over the U.S. posture in Syria, determining the future of the American military presence in Afghanistan, and defense spending. Based on anonymous reports from some in attendance, a May 20th meeting didn't turn out too well. At several points during the meeting with Chief of Staff and National Security Advisor Susan Rice, the participants began to leave one by one.

Hagel delivers commencement advice

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel addressed Naval Academy graduates last week during their commencement ceremonies and he gave them three pieces of advice. One, "connect with people on a personal level", two, "try to understand perspectives that are different from yours" and three, "be humble". He also cautioned them about pressure saying, "Once you take up your duty stations and the responsibility of leadership, you will find yourselves under tremendous pressures you've never experienced."

Nuclear missile base flunked security drill

According to an internal Air Force review obtained by The Associated Press, armed security forces at a nuclear missile base failed a drill last summer that simulated the hostile takeover of a missile launch silo because they were unable to speedily regain control of the captured nuclear weapon. The AP's Robert Burns writes, "the previously unreported failure, which the Air Force called a `critical deficiency,' was the reason the 341st Missile Wing at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana flunked its broader safety and security inspection."

Aegis Ashore test successful

The Missile Defense Agency, the U.S. Navy, and sailors at the Aegis Ashore Missile Defense Test Complex and Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) successfully conducted the first flight test involving components of the Aegis Ashore system. During the test, a simulated ballistic missile target was acquired, tracked, and engaged by the Aegis Weapon System. The primary purpose of the test was to confirm the functionality of Aegis Ashore by launching a land-based SM-3.

How much damage has Chinese hacking done to the US government?

A government report indicates more than 40 Pentagon weapons programs and nearly 30 other defense technologies have been compromised by cyber intrusions from China. The cybersecurity firm Mandiant issued a report last year alleging links between a secret Chinese military unit and years of cyber-attacks against U.S. companies. Alcoa World Alumina, Westinghouse Electric Co., Allegheny Technologies, U.S. Steel Corp., the United Steelworkers Union and Solar-World are just six companies the Justice Department says were victims of Chinese hacking. U.S. officials suggest there are many more amounting to billions of dollars in economic losses.

Russian troops still on Ukraine border

The Pentagon says Russia is not withdrawing its troops from the Ukraine border, despite Moscow's claim that the order to pull out has been given. Rear Adm. John Kirby says small numbers of Russian troops have gone back and forth to forward operating bases near the border, but the U.S. has seen no movement of Russian troops back to their home bases. NATO says Russia has 40,000 troops along the border.

Military personnel disciplined for sexual assaults

The Pentagon has revealed the U.S. military fired or disciplined nearly 500 workers for sexual harassment. In a 12-month period, and nearly 13 percent of the complaints filed involved repeat offenders. The report on May 15th was the first such report on sexual harassment. It says there were 1,366 reports in the last year.

Unrest in Africa growing

The Pentagon says almost 300 Marines have been moved to a naval air station in Sicily in response to the growing unrest in Africa. There is trouble in Sudan, the Central African Republic, Libya and Nigeria. The U.S. is using surveillance drones in the search for the kidnapped Nigerian girls. Officials say at least one Global Hawk surveillance drone is in use, in addition to manned MC-12 aircraft.

Drone being used in Nigeria

The Pentagon is using drones to help search in northeastern Nigeria for school girls kidnapped by the terror group Boko Haram, although they will not call them drones. Pentagon spokesman Colonel Steve Warren explains, "as a general rule we don't discuss our use of unmanned aircraft." He indicates there are security concerns, continuing, "there are sensitivities surrounding where they are based out of." Warren says they are being used to collect intelligence and conduct surveillance.

US commits dozens to help in Nigerian search

We are getting a clearer picture of how much help the U.S. is giving Nigeria to help in the search for almost 300 school girls kidnapped by terror group Boko Haram. The Pentagon says 16 DoD personnel are a part of a government-wide team of 30. The team includes planners and advisers already in Nigeria that have been redirected to assist the government. France, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger, as well as representatives of Britain and the EU are all helping in the search.

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