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10:28 pm, July 23, 2014

Cyber Security Report

National Security Correspondent J.J. Green has traveled three continents covering intelligence, terrorism, and security issues. From Afghanistan to Africa, Iraq to Ireland, there isn't anywhere J.J. won't go, nor anyone he won't talk with, to get the stories affecting the cyber security community.

U.S. Cyber Industry takes lead

Both the White House and Congress have asserted that protecting the nation's resources from cyber-attacks is a top priority. Techworld is reporting enacting legislation designed to enhance security for critical infrastructure components such as water, power, telecom and transport facilities that is acceptable to both political parties has been a struggle. The problem political differences. But Cyber industry leaders have started to work on a voluntary standards and best practices platform to provide some level of security.

Wall Street Conducts cyber drill

Cyber-attacks on banks are growing more frequent. Wall Street has just conducted a cyber-defense exercise called "Quantum Dawn 2,". During the drill, bank employees were stationed at their normal offices, and were emailed throughout the day with bits of information that could indicate an encroaching hacker attack. They monitored a simulated stock exchange for irregular trading and were pressed to figure out what was going on and how to react while sharing information with regulators and each other.

Center watches cyber threats

Ever hear of the Multi-State Information Security and Analysis Center? It's a division of the Center for Internet Security. Their focus is cyber threat prevention, protection, response and recovery for state, local territory and tribal governments. Their objectives iclude providing two-way sharing of information and early warnings on cyber security threats, dissemination of information on cyber security incidents, to promote awareness and coordinate training.

Cyber warriors are targets

Will exploit developers become potential targets of state-sponsored assassinations in the future -like the nuclear scientists in recent times? There's been some discussion in the "Tech" community regarding the legitimacy of using lethal force against civilian hackers. As a result some are wondering what the future might hold for exploit developers and other members of the cyber supply chain who are facilitating state-funded, offensive cyber operations.

What are hackers after

We hear a lot about zero-day attacks and system vulnerabilities, but most hackers look for easier enterprises like the application used to access the Web. That's the one most online attackers will target. Why? Because most attackers and online exploit kit designers realize that the common browser is usually an endpoint's weakest link. Not only are enterprises generally slow to keep up with browser patching, they're downright sluggish at updating plug-ins and extensions.

Chinese hackers identified

Earlier this year information security firm Mandiant identified a previously unknown group hackers thought to be in China. "People referred to China or Chinese hackers, but there was plenty of wiggle room there to assume it could be a collection of guys working in someone's basement without a tie to the government," Richard Behtlich chief security officer for Mandiant. The group the identified is called Unit 61398. Bejtlich says, "we showed pretty conclusively that at least this one group is part of the PLA" AKA The Chinese People's Liberation Army.

Police warned about hackers

Law enforcement and first responders have been put on notice --their mobile phones are targets for hackers. They've been informed in roll call bulletins that hackers, by compromising mobile technology and exploiting vulnerabilities in portable operating systems, application software, and hardware. Compromise of a mobile device can have an impact beyond the device itself; malware can propagate across interconnected networks.

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