bnv.fnr.news/microsites;pentbeyond=main;tile=1;pos=top;sz=728x90,970x90;ord=
7:29 pm, October 25, 2014

Pentagon & Beyond

National Security Correspondent J.J. Green has traveled three continents covering intelligence, terrorism, and security issues. From Afghanistan to Africa, Iraq to Ireland, there isn't anywhere J.J. won't go, nor anyone he won't talk with, to get the stories affecting the defense and national security communities.

Canada to stay in Afghanistan until 2014

Canada confirmed Tuesday that 950 soldiers and support staff will remain in Afghanistan in a training role after Canada's combat mission ends in 2011. Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon said they will be stationed in the Kabul area and will stay until 2014. The pledge of support may help plug a critical shortage of trainers for NATO's year-old mission to bolster Afghan security forces. The training mission would be confined to military bases.

Drug traffickers buy long range planes

It's the latest innovation by international drug traffickers. U.S. prosecutors say South American gangs are buying old jets and other planes, filling them with cocaine and flying them more than 3,000 miles across the ocean to Africa. At least three gangs have struck deals to fly drugs to West Africa and from there to Europe, according to U.S. indictments. Most of the cocaine flown to Africa is bound for Europe, where demand has been rising over the last decade.

Honor finally restored

Almost 100 years after his death, a black Union Civil War vet from South Carolina finally has a veterans marker on his grave. The Associated Press reports, the white gravestone for Henry Benjamin Noisette was dedicated Thursday during a Veterans Day ceremony at a small black cemetery near an interstate. Noisette's military past was not discovered until recently by a researcher with the African American Historical Alliance, a nonprofit working to increase awareness of the role of blacks in the war and Reconstruction in South Carolina. Noisette escaped slavery and joined the U.S. Navy in 1862.

Germany deploys cautiously

More than 60 years after world war two, Germany is still very sensitve how it deploys it's troops in foreign countries. The government has announced it will extend three military deployments including its contribution to an EU naval force tracking pirates off Somalia. Germany has more than 300 troops participating in the anti-piracy force. There are 120 soldiers to Bosnia, and it's considering sending a ship with 220 soldiers to take part in NATO's Active Endeavour operation patrolling in the Mediterranean. Germany also has 4,900 troops in Afghanistan.

What was that?

Missile launches off the coast of California are commonplace --but this one was a mystery. Military officials said early on it didn't represent a threat to the United States. They also said it was not a launch by a foreign power. The video captured by a news helicopter showed an object shooting across the sky and leaving a large vapor trail. DoD said it wasn't involved, and that it might have been created by something flown by a private company. Which could lead to big trouble for that company.

Enriched uranium moved

The U.S. government says it has removed nearly 132 pounds of spent nuclear fuel from a shuttered San Diego-area reactor that conducted research for nearly 40 years. The National Nuclear Security Administration disclosed the removal Monday in a press release without revealing the name of the research facility. The agency says nearly 60 kilograms of enriched uranium was moved during three weeks in August and September in three convoys to an unspecified secure federal facility nearly 1,000 miles from San Diego.

What will the next fighter jet look like?

The new fighter jet. What will it look like? Experts say it's going to have to deal with enemies equipped for electronic attack and with sophisticated air defenses, passive detection, integrated self-protection, directed energy weapons and cyber attack capabilities. The Air Force Materiel Command said in a notice to the Defense industry, the new aircraft must be able to operate in the "anti-access/area-denial environment that will exist in the 2030-2050 timeframe."

More Drones are coming

The Air Force is planning to develop more high-tech drones that can collect intelligence and better maneuver in the combat airspace. According to the Associated Press, the Air Force has already dramatically increased the number of armed and unarmed drones over Afghanistan and Iraq. But Air Force Lt. Gen. Philip Breedlove says there are growing worries that the U.S. needs better aircraft to gather information and conduct electronic attacks in airspace.

Al Qaida's promising another attack

Al Qaida's affiliate in Iraq is promising more attacks after 58 people were killed in an attck on a church this week. The Islamic State of Iraq launched an attack on a Catholic church during Mass in downtown Baghdad last Sunday said its deadline for Egypt's Coptic chruch, which allegedly is holding women hostage for converting to Islam must be released before the attacks stop. This attack was the deadliest ever recorded against Iraq's Christians, whose numbers have plummeted since the 2003.

Yemen is still a problem

Yemen has been a trouble spot for more than a decade and explosives have always been the problem and they've always been relatively small. It was in 1998 that the U.S.S. Cole, a Navy Destroyer was attack while in Yemen. 17 sailors were killed and 39 were injured. A small craft approached the port side of the destroyer, and an explosion occurred, leaving a 40-by-40-foot gash in the ship's port side. The toner cartridges with the explosive PETN in them that were discovered aboard planes in the UK and Dubai last week contained only a small amount, but had they gone off, they would've inflicted maximum damage.

British send message to U.S. Government

Take down the websites used by extremists. British Minister of Security Pauline Neville-Jones called on the the U.S. to do that during a speech at the Brookings Institution. She also urged the U.S. to do more to stop militant threats without going to war. Neville-Jones pointed about Al Qaeda's leaders in Pakistan have shown "startling resilience" and their affiliates have both the intent and the capability to strike the West.

Airmen finally arrive home

The remains of two servicemen, missing in action from World War II, including one from Maryland were laid to rest yesterday. Army Air Forces Staff Sgts. Claude G. Tyler of Landover, Md. and Claude A. Ray of Coffeyville, Kan were both 24. Tyler was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, and Ray was buried in Fallbrook, Calif. They took off from an airfield near New Guinea on Oct. 27, 1943. They were to land near the Bismarck Sea, but the craft was lost. In August 2003 a Defense Department team received information on a crash site from a citizen in Papua New Guinea. That led to the identification of Tyler and Ray.

Another military building hit by gunfire

USMC recruiters in Chantilly discovered in the early morning hours yesterday that their office had been hit by gunfire overnight while the building was being renovated. The recruiters had been working out of their Sterling, Virginia office. This was the third military facility that had been shot at in the same two week time frame. The Pentagon and the Marine Corp Museum had been hit by gunfire from the same weapon. Authorities in an Illinois suburb are also looking into the stabbing of a Marine recruiter that happened within that time period.

U.S. and S. Korean drills canceled

Did the cancellation of joint military exercises between the U.S. and S. Korea in the Yellow Sea have anything to do with China. Not according to the Pentagon. A spokesman said the two navies couldn't agree on a timetable. He also said the exercises in international water should pose no problems for neither China nor North Korea The South Korean media reported the drills had been cancelled because of complaints from China.

New Wikileaks release puts Iraqis at risk

A team of experts has been pouring over the latest release of documents from wiki leaks. Pentagon spokesman Dave Lapan said they didn't reveal anything that hadn't already been reported. Most of the material dealt with tactical intelligence and unit level reporting of events and incidents that took place during the Iraq War. What the Pentagon has said is that Iraqis whose names that do appear in the documents are understandably at risk.

MDA fails to shoot down missile

The military's Missile Defense Agency plan to shoot down a fake ballistic missile of the coast of Central California was not successful. The objective of the mission was for the ALTB to destroy a solid-fuel, short-range ballistic missile while its rocket motors were still thrusting. A news release from the agency says, the Terrier Black Brant target missile was launched successfully, the system acquired and tracked the target, but never transitioned to active tracking.

Attacks on Al Qaida intensifying

The government of Yemen is trying to put down a branch of al Qaida that has attacked Western and regional targets in the country next to oil giant Saudi Arabia. So Yemeni authorities offer a reward of $50,000 for information on the whereabouts of two Saudi "terrorists", Turki al-Shahrani and Ahmed al-Jasser. Yemeni aircraft bombed al Qaeda positions in southern Yemen.

Pentagon looking at gunfire detection system

"Shot spotter" is being considered for use at the Pentagon specifically to help in situations like the one that unfolded yesterday. "Two exterior windows had been hit by gunfire," says Pentagon Force Protection director Steven Calvery. Shot spotter is a gunfire location and detection tool that uses acoustic sensors to determine where gunshots came from, when they were fired and it can even determine whether an automatic weapon was used.

New approach to European security suggested

The European Union should establish a three-way dialogue on security with Russia and Turkey to tackle frozen conflicts and promote stability on its eastern flank, a leading think-tank says. In a report released today, the European Council on Foreign Relations said the 27-nation EU must take more responsibility for security in its own neighborhood because the United States has its hands full dealing with Afghanistan, Iran and China and is no longer focused on Europe. The study says the current system failed to prevent wars in Kosovo and Georgia, or disruption to Europe's gas supplies, or to resolve a string of legacy disputes on the fringes of the former Soviet Union.

Assange hit by more setbacks

Two major setbacks for Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange. He was denied a Swedish residency permit and his website had been dumped by a company that handled many of its donations. The Swedish government declined to say why he was denied residency saying the reason was confidential. As far as donations go, Moneybookers.com told Assange he'd been dropped because of concerns about risk management and his website had essentially been watch listed.

  •  
  • 39
  •