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5:42 pm, December 19, 2014

Pentagon & Beyond

National Security Correspondent J.J. Green has traveled three continents covering intelligence, terrorism, and security issues. From Afghanistan to Africa, Iraq to Ireland, there isn't anywhere J.J. won't go, nor anyone he won't talk with, to get the stories affecting the defense and national security communities.

Intifada Report under investigation

Reports about a Third Intifada being organized against Israel apparently were bogus. "They investigated that Facebook page and they couldn't trace it back to any Palestinian individual or organization," says Maen Areikat, Representative for the Palestinian Liberation Organization. "It's really interesting to know who is behind it," says Areikat. As far as any future Palestinian protests go, he says any future protests, "continue to be peaceful and not resort to violence."

Emergency declared in Abidjan

Alassane Ouattara's, President in waiting in the Ivory Coast has declared an overnight curfew in the main city of Abidjan from now until Sunday. A Ouattara spokesman says the curfew was needed "for security reasons" and would run from nine o'clock in the evening through to six o'clock in the morning each day. Ouattara is locked in a bitter dispute over the Presidency in that war-torn country with incumbent Laurent Bagbo. Ouattara won the election but has not been able to assume the office.

NATO takes control on Libyan effort

NATO has taken over command of the No-Fly zone and other military efforts to stop Libyan leader Muamar Gadhafi's military and help the rebels gain steam. A U.s. intelligence source says the British and French have troops on the ground and supply guidance to the rebels while the a wealthy Middle Eastern government is bank rolling the effort to supply weapons to the rebels. As that effort continues, there are major concerns about possibly arming the rebels.

Gadhafi pushing back

Muammar Gaddafi's army hasn't thrown in the towel yet. They set back the momentum of the rebels troops who were headed toward Tripoli. In the meantime Admiral James Stravridis, the U.S. head of NATO said there "flickers" of Al Qaida in Libya, waiting to fill the void left behind by Gadhafi, if he's ousted. But Stavridis added the is no evidence of a significant presence. The NATO-led aerial bombardment of Libyan forces is expected to continue until Gaddafi gives up or is defeated.

U.S. pulling out

You can expect gradual movement of U.S. ships out of the Mediterranean. NATO is taking command of the international military campaign in Libya and is in charge of air strikes, an arms blockade and no-fly zone put in place to protect Libyan civilians from Muamar Ghadafi. The U.S. will still have a role, but it will not be leading the effort. At one point 11 U.S. vessels were stationed in the Mediterranean, including three submarines, two guided-missile destroyers and two amphibious assault ships

Pirates Turned Back

Two Virginia-based ships are being credited with thwarting a pirate attack on a Philippine-flagged merchant vessel in the Arabian Sea. The Pentagon says the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise and the guided missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf responded Thursday to the Falcon Trader II after the ship reported pirates in a skiff were attempting to board the vessel. The ships dispatched two helicopters to the Philippine vessel, and they fired warning shots. Men were seen jumping from the ship and speeding away in their skiff.

F-35 Engine work stopped

The Pentagon is stopping work on an new engine for the Air Force F-35 fighter jet. This engine was designed to be a back-up. The reason is because of money. The stoppage is expected to last for 90 days. There was no money included in President Obama's budget proposal for the next fiscal year for the project. But budget deliberations continue. Congress is split on the project. Some like, some don't. GE and Rolls Royce are the contractors.

How much is the Libyan war costing the U.S?

The AP's Donna Cassata writes, "As of Tuesday, the coalition had fired at least 162 sea-launched Tomahawk missiles priced at $1 million to $1.5 million apiece and dispatched B-2 stealth bombers - round-trip from Missouri - to drop 2,000-pound bombs on Libyan sites. Total flying time: 25 hours. Operating cost for one hour: at least $10,000." And that's only a part of the cost.

U.S. participation in Libyan war to decrease

Defense Secretary Robert Gates and others said the U.S. military's role will lessen in coming days as other countries take on more missions and the need declines for large-scale offensive action. Tomahawk cruise missiles fired by U.S. ships and submarines off Libya's coast were a part of that action. Senior Defense officials the attacks thus far had reduced Libya's air defense capabilities by more than 50 percent.

Al Qaida claims Iraq attack

Al Qaida in Iraq has claimed responsibility for last week's car bomb attack on an Iraqi army unit that killed at least eight soldiers The bomb targeted an army headquarters in the northern area of Diyala province. 30 others were wounded when it exploded last Monday. Security forces stopped a second attack and defused a car bomb parked at the scene. The attacks in Iraq are a daily occurrence as insurgence continue to attack Iraqi forces knowing that U.S. troops are leaving Iraq totally at the end of this year.

Iran closes in on a nuclear weapon

The State Department's senior adviser for non-proliferation and arms control says Iran is approaching the capability to produce nuclear weapons. Robert Einhorn told the Arms Control Association yesterday in his own words, "We believe that at a minimum Iran is moving to the threshold of a nuclear weapons capability." But he clarified that he was referring to their intentions rather than their actual capabilities. Some have speculated Iran could reach the point where it could produce a nuke this year.

Iran offers to help find Levinson

Iran wants more information from the U.S. on a former FBI agent who vanished in 2007 claiming they would make an attempt to find him. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said last week Washington had seen recent indications that Robert Levinson was being held in southwest Asia and appealed to Iran to help find him, despite past frustration that Tehran had ignored U.S. pleas for information about him.

Libyan no-fly zone studied

Gulf Arab countries have been thinking about imposing a no-fly zone over Libya. That exercise requires more than just a blank declaration preventing Libya government jets from flying. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates told Congress in his own words, "let's just call a spade a spade. A no-fly zone begins with an attack on Libya to destroy the air defenses." The question that arises now is what are the Arab states willing to do that? The U.S. is said to be thinking about giving weapons to the rebels fighting the Gadhafi regime, but no firm decision has been made.

Gates fires back on Predators

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates is not happy with the slow pace of using unmanned Predator drone aircraft. They've had great success in Afghanistan, dating back to early 2008. Gates told the Air Force Academy Friday that "it's been like pulling teeth" to get more of the planes "because people were stuck in old ways of doing business." Gates also clashed with Air Force leadership over production of the top-of-the-line, F-22 Raptor. He said pressure to build more than twice the number budgeted by the Defense Department is a problem.

Local troops killed in Afghanistan

According to the Pentagon, two soldiers assigned to the Aberdeen Proving Ground have been killed in Afghanistan. Twenty-five-year-old Staff Sgt. Chauncy Mays of Cookville, Texas, and 22-year-old Spc. Christopher Stark of Monett, Mo., died Monday in Wardak province when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 63rd Explosive Ordnance Disposal Battalion, 20th Support Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground.

Protesters challenge Iranian government

There are reports from Iran that small pockets of protestors took to the streets yesterday, inspired by the uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa. Sources say the Iranian government has cleverly refrained from deadly force against the protesters publicly, instead injuring them and sending them to hospitals. Several sources reports however, men and women wearing doctors and nurses uniforms were roaming the hallways, but they are actually members of the notorious Basijee or auxiliary police who work for government. There are reports patients may have been attacked.

U.S. forces on the move in North Africa

The Pentagon has moved some of its forces in the region near Libya into position, but won't say for what. Defense Department spokesman Col. Dave Lapan says Pentagon planners are working on various options and contingency plans as the violence aimed at overthrowing the government continues. As a part of that planning, the Pentagon is repositioning some naval and air forces. The U.S. has a regular military presence in the Mediterranean Sea and farther to the south has two aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf area.

Get ready Army

The Army has to get ready for the future, which includes complex threats from terrorists seeking weapons of mass destruction, hostile nation-states capable of nuclear warfare and the modern militaries being assembled in Russia and China. Defense Secretary Robert Gates told West Point cadets on Friday, they are joining a force that has been under pressure, but even though they've been stressed, they've been resilient. This is likely Gates last address to West Point. He's expected to leave the post this year.

Psy-Ops Unit allegedly targeted U.S. officials

Did a U.S. military psychological operations unit in Afghanistan try to persuade visiting U.S. senators to increase war funding? A Rolling Stone magazine article quotes the leader of the Army unit, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Holmes, who seems to substantiate it. According to the article Homes says he objected to what he saw as an illegal use of his team's skills on American citizens. The article said the unit was ordered by Lieutenant General William Caldwell, a three-star commander in charge of training Afghan troops, to target visiting dignitaries.

Is Kuwait next?

Kuwait's Ambassador to the U.S. says Kuwait is safe from the kinds of protests that have toppled the governments in Egypt and Tunisia. His Excellency Sheikh Salem Abdullah Al-Jaber Al-Sabah says the protests that have taken place there are a group of people who came there from Iraq, Syria and other places and destroyed their identification papers hoping to convince the government they are Bedouins and be granted citizenship. Why? In Kuwait, Housing is free for all, so is education and there are no taxes.

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