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6:52 pm, July 31, 2014

In Depth

Monday - Friday, 4-7 p.m.

In Depth with Francis Rose features daily interviews with top government executives and contractors. Listen live from 4 to 7 p.m. or download his archived interviews below.

Tuesday - 07/22/2014, 04:04pm EDT
Beth McGrath, Federal Practice Director, Deloitte

The Office of Management and Budget requires federal agencies include more data in its 2016 budget requests for this fall. OMB wants benchmarks and timelines of financial investments so it can organize its cross-agency priority goals. Beth McGrath is director of Deloitte's Federal Practice. She's also former deputy chief management officer at the Defense Department. In a Federal News Radio op-ed and on In Depth with Francis Rose, McGrath said agencies should be making even more business decisions based on data.

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Tuesday - 07/22/2014, 03:58pm EDT
Jessica Klement, Legislative Director, NARFE

The Government Accountability Office is in the middle of an ongoing, multi-year study on the pay system, and taking its findings to Capitol Hill. A House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee looked at the General Schedule last week. Jessica Klement is legislative director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association. She shared her own ideas of how to reform the General Schedule on In Depth with Francis Rose.

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Tuesday - 07/22/2014, 03:55pm EDT
Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.)

Your agency could save itself time and work on the hiring process if a new bill from Senator Jon Tester becomes law. The Competitive Service Act would let other agencies share information about applicants they didn't hire that might fit your agency's openings. In our Congressional Spotlight on In Depth with Francis Rose, Senator Tester explained how he thinks the bill will make your agency's hiring process faster and better.

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Tuesday - 07/22/2014, 03:53pm EDT
Bob Tobias, Director, Key Executive Leadership Programs

The Department of Homeland Security answers to ninety-two Congressional committees and another twenty-seven outside organizations. The Annenberg Public Policy Center says that's a total of one hundred nineteen different oversight groups. Bob Tobias is Director of Key Executive Leadership Programs at American University. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he said the complicated web of leadership might be a big reason why Congress has never passed an authorization bill for agency.

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Tuesday - 07/22/2014, 03:51pm EDT
Charlie Crum, Director, Office of Inspector General, USPS

3D printing can help the Postal Service save a lot money, gas, and time, according to its Inspector General. 3D printers can make things like screws and containers using plastics and powders. Charlie Crum is a director at the Postal Service OIG. His office has a plan to help the agency jump into the 3D printing business, and he shared that plan on In Depth with Francis Rose.

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Monday - 07/21/2014, 04:27pm EDT
David Hawkings, Senior Editor, Roll Call

The goal to get a spending bill done for your agency looks less and less likely by the time the fiscal year ends September 30th. And the other work Congress thought it could get done -- reform at the Department of Veterans Affairs -- seems to be hitting a wall too. David Hawkings is Senior Editor at Roll Call, and he shared the progress for both of these major pieces of work on In Depth with Francis Rose.

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Monday - 07/21/2014, 04:24pm EDT
Vice Adm. Norb Ryan, President, MOAA

The Senate Veterans Affairs Committee will consider the nomination of Robert McDonald as the next VA Secretary tomorrow. If the Senate confirms him, he'll inherit a Veterans Health Administration that hasn't had a major review of its healthcare system since the mid-1980s, according to the Military Officers Association of America. Vice Admiral Norb Ryan is president of MOAA. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he said Congress and the White House should build a commission focused on reforming the VHA.

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Monday - 07/21/2014, 04:20pm EDT
Mike Causey, Senior Correspondent, Federal News Radio

Defenders of the General Schedule are hard to find, if you can find them at all. All the stakeholders agree the GS setup doesn't work for the federal government in the 21st century. On In Depth with Francis Rose, Federal News Radio Senior Correspondent Mike Causey said even the names of the slots on the schedule don't really work right any more.

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Monday - 07/21/2014, 04:16pm EDT
Steve Kelman, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Federal agencies that want cheap web design and app developer contracts face a potentially large roadblock called the the Federal Acquisition Regulation. One reason is a part of the FAR that can limit how numerous (and how cheap) an agency's IT options are. Steve Kelman is professor of public management at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He said those requirements are scaring smaller companies away from competing for those types of IT contracts on In Depth with Francis Rose.

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Monday - 07/21/2014, 04:10pm EDT
Robert Goldenkoff, Director of Strategic Issues, GAO

Restructuring the way the federal government organizes its employees is all of a sudden a big focus on Capitol Hill. Bills to change or kill the General Schedule are already floating around, and more may come. The House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service and the Census looked at the future of the General Schedule with witnesses from the Office of Personnel Management, the Federal Managers Association, the American Federation of Government Employees and the Government Accountability Office. Robert Goldenkoff is Director of Strategic Issues at the GAO. He told the committee HR management in the Federal government has been on the GAO's High Risk list since 2001, but he said not all the news is bad on In Depth with Francis Rose.

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Monday - 07/21/2014, 04:08pm EDT
Guy Timberlake, American Small Business Coalition

The fourth quarter of fiscal 2014 is in full swing. Last year's fourth quarter saw federal agencies hand out $125 billion in new contract obligations, according to Guy Timberlake. He's chief visionary and chief executive officer of the American Small Business Coalition. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he said federal contractors can find plenty of ways to take advantage of the fiscal year-end spending spree -- as long as they take a simple approach.

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Friday - 07/18/2014, 04:10pm EDT
Steve Bucci, Heritage Foundation

Federal officials say Chinese hackers broke into the networks of the Government Accountability Office and the Government Printing Office back in March. While news of Chinese cyber attacks on federal agencies isn't unprecedented, the March attacks, first reported by the New York Times, have some observers scratching their heads. They say it's unclear why those two agencies would be targeted -- particularly in the case of GPO. Steve Bucci is director of the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign and National Security Policy at the Heritage Foundation. He's also former deputy assistant Defense secretary. He said the attacks shouldn't come as a surprise on In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu.

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Friday - 07/18/2014, 04:07pm EDT
Robert Levinson, Senior Defense Analyst, Bloomberg Government

Top Pentagon officials have been railing against the consequences of sequestration ever since the Budget Control Act was passed in 2011. And in their planning documents, they've also decided not to acknowledge the likelihood that the cuts are here to stay. For the last three years, officials have submitted budget requests that exceed the caps in current law, and they've indicated they plan to continue doing so in future years. Even if the Pentagon isn't building its military plans around sequestration, some outside analysts are taking a look at what various scenarios would look like under lower funding levels. One of them is Rob Levinson. He's a senior defense analyst for Bloomberg Government, and shared some financial predictions on In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu.

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Thursday - 07/17/2014, 05:06pm EDT
Gen. James Clapper, Director, National Intelligence

The nation's top intelligence official says transparency is going to have to be a feature of the intelligence community from now on. Gen. James Clapper, the director of national intelligence says that's his main takeaway from the Edward Snowden leaks and their continuing fallout. Clapper is the guest on the latest edition of AFCEA Answers on Federal News Radio. In this excerpt, he told host Max Cacas he makes no apologies for the programs Snowden exposed, but intelligence agencies need to do a better job of explaining why they do what they do.

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Thursday - 07/17/2014, 04:51pm EDT
Tim McManus, Partnership for Public Service

The hunt for a job in the federal government can be confusing from the very start. Logging onto USA Jobs and searching for a job as a "secretary" can land you options ranging from public affairs officer to associate deputy assistant secretary for program planning and budget. Then comes navigating the technical requirements, executive core requirements, and the actual application process itself. Tim McManus is Vice President for Education and Outreach at the Partnership for Public Service. He shared some tips for aspiring feds on In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu.

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Thursday - 07/17/2014, 04:47pm EDT
Todd Harrison, Senior Fellow, CSBA

The Defense Department's overseas contingency budget might survive the end of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Wednesday, two of the Pentagon's top civilian and uniformed leaders asked the House Armed Services Committee to keep authorizing an OCO budget even after the U.S. finishes the draw-downs in the region. DoD's latest OCO request came late in the year, and it's less than Congress anticipated. The House set aside $79 billion for OCO funding when it passed DoD's baseline budget for fiscal 2015, but now the Pentagon is only asking for about $59 billion. Todd Harrison is senior fellow for the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. He explained how the budget deliberations on Capitol Hill might unfold on In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu.

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Thursday - 07/17/2014, 04:33pm EDT
Pamela Walker, Information Technology Alliance for Public Sector

Last week, President Obama signed the annual authorization bill for the U.S. Intelligence Community, making several changes to the way federal agencies and contractors deal with classified information and IT systems. Several of the provisions appear to be a reaction to the security clearance issues raised by the Edward Snowden case and by the Navy Yard shooting. Pamela Walker is senior director for homeland security at the Information Technology Alliance for Public Sector. She's been analyzing the final bill, and joined In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu to talk about some of the provisions.

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Wednesday - 07/16/2014, 05:10pm EDT
Jim Silkenat, National President, American Bar Association

There are a lot of reasons the Department of Veterans Affairs has a huge backlog of disability claims. One is the vast number of new claims VA receives: about a million per year. A second is the sheer complexity of the process and the statutes and case law behind it. VA seems to be acknowledging the complexity of the system in a new partnership it's just formed with the American Bar Association. The new Veterans Claims Assistance Network will offer pro-bono legal services to veterans so that they can put together fully-developed claims. Jim Silkenat is the national president of the American Bar Association. He explained how the program will work on In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu.

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Wednesday - 07/16/2014, 04:36pm EDT
Susan Hanson, Senior Resident Agent, FBI

Justice is served for three Alabama prison guards and a corrections officer who murdered an inmate. They face five to 35 year prison sentences, and the woman who helped put them behind bars now faces some high praise. Susan Hanson, senior resident agent for the FBI in Dothan, Alabama, is a Service to America medal winner in the Homeland Security and Law Enforcement category. She tells In Depth guest host Jared Serbu how the case started. See a photo gallery of all SAMMIES finalists. Read a Q&A and related story.

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Wednesday - 07/16/2014, 04:27pm EDT
Christopher Zember and Jay Harrison

The Defense Department has some significant blind spots when it comes to its ability to assess what's going on in the global technology landscape -- especially in the commercial and non-defense markets. DoD officials are keenly aware of the problem, and there's a nascent effort underway to help solve it. The new Technology Domain Awareness initiative is a project of DoD's Information Analysis Centers. Christopher Zember is the director of the Information Analysis Centers. And Jay Harrison is the director of the Center for Smart Defense at West Virginia University, which is helping DoD get the TDA effort of the ground. They explained the initial drive behind TDA on In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu.

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