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Allied forces launch Normandy Invasion June 6, 1944

Seventy years later, Naval History & Heritage Command shares D-Day photos.

AUTOPLAY 

D-Day Invasion
Seventy years ago today, June 6, 1944, combined Allied forces landed in France as part of the D-Day invasion.

This photo gallery is made up of images from the Naval History & Heritage Command (NHHC), which has put together a website of images around Operation Overlord: Invasion Normandy.

On Monday, June 9, Julie Kowalsky, curator with NHHC's Historic Small Arms Division, joined Federal Drive with Tom Temin and Emily Kopp to talk about the work her office does.

In this photo, Army troops wade ashore on "Omaha" Beach during the D-Day landings. A Coast Guard manned LCVP [Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel] brought the troops to the beach.

(Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives)
Sinking Ship
USS Tide (AM-125) sinks off "Utah" Beach after striking a mine during the Normandy invasion, June 7, 1944. USS PT-509 and USS Pheasant (AM-61) stand by.

(Photographed from USS Threat (AM-124). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)
Normandy Coast
As a Coast Guard manned LST [Landing Ship, Tank] approaches the Normandy coast on "D-Day", June 6 1944, a signalman on the bridge uses a blinker lamp.

If you look closely, you can see a folded bicycle stowed atop the vehicle in the lower right.

(Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives)
Unloading Tanks and Trucks
A Coast Guard manned USS LST-21 unloads British Army tanks and trucks onto a "Rhino" barge during the early hours of the invasion on June 6, 1944.

The nickname of the Sherman tank at the left is "Virgin".

(Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives)
Forming Up
Landing ships put cargo ashore on one of the invasion beaches, at low tide during the first days of the operation, June 1944.

Among identifiable ships present are USS LST-532 (center); USS LST-262 (third LST from right); USS LST-310 (second LST from right); USS LST-533 (partially visible at far right); and USS LST-524.

Barrage balloons fly overhead and an Army "half-track" convoy forms up on the beach.

(Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives)
Afternoon View
On the afternoon of "D-Day," June 6, 1944, "Omaha" Beach shows casualties, a bogged-down "Sherman" tank, several wrecked trucks and German anti-landing obstructions. To the left, an LST is beached and invasion shipping is off shore.

(Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)
Off to France
U.S. Army troops wait on board a LCT [Landing Craft Tank], waiting to ride across the English Channel to France. Some of these men wear 101st Airborne Division insignia. Photograph released June 12, 1944.

(Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)
Convoy
With barrage balloons overhead, a convoy of LCI(L)s [Landing Craft Infantry (Large)] are en route to the Normandy beaches on June 6, 1944.

(Photographed from USS Ancon (AGC-4). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)
Firing Guns
The USS Nevada (BB-36) fires its forward 14"/45 guns on positions ashore, during June 6, 1944, landings on "Utah" Beach.

(Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives)
Senior Officers
Off Normandy, June 8, 1944, senior U.S. officers watch operations from the bridge of USS Augusta (CA-31).

They are, from left, Rear Admiral Alan G. Kirk, commander, Western Naval Task Force; Lt. Gen. Omar N. Bradley, commanding general, U.S. First Army; Rear Admiral Arthur D. Struble, (with binoculars) Chief of Staff for Kirk; and Army Maj. Gen. Hugh Keen.

(Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.)
D-Day Assault
Troops land June 6, 1944, from USS LCI(L)-412 during the "D-Day" assault on "Omaha" Beach.

(Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)
Combat Art
Navy Combat Artist Dwight Shepler painted this watercolor entitled "The Battle for Fox Green Beach" in 1944. It shows the USS Emmons (DD-457) bombarding in support of the "Omaha" Beach landings, during the Normandy invasion.

(Courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Collection, Washington, D.C./Official U.S. Navy Photograph.)
Wading Ashore
Troops wade ashore from a LCVP landing craft, off "Omaha" Beach, on June 1944.

(Photograph from the Army Signal Corps Collection in the U.S. National Archives)
Off the Beaches
LCI(L) convoy gathers off the invasion beaches on June 6, 1944.

Photographed from USS Nevada (BB-36). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)
Beach Traffic
A different type of beach traffic that we experience today was photographed from a Ninth Air Force bomber during the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944.

If you look closely, you can see the vehicle lanes leading away from the landing areas, and landing craft beached by the tide.

(Official U.S. Air Force photo)
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