DHS struggles to define cybersecurity mission

Monday - 8/2/2010, 4:00pm EDT

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  • It's been seven years since the Homeland Security Department identified cybersecurity as a primary mission but the agency says it's still struggling to define the scope of that mission. DHS Deputy Secretary Jane Holl Lute, speaking at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas, called for more debate and increased awareness of the issue. Lute said the cybersecurity challenge is even more problematic because cyberspace is built on an insecure platform. But there is some good news. According to Federal Computer Week, Lute cites the National Cyber Incident Response Center and the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace as two major accomplishments from the agency.

  • Sixty percent of information security professionals say they're underpaid according to InfoSecurity.com. If you are in the business, here is some advice on managing your career that executives shared at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas recently. The panel included Mike Murray, a managing partner with Mad Security and Lee Kushner, the president of L.J.Kushner & Associates. They say, first be sure you know the business you want to be in; understand what market opportunities are out there; what your competition is; and have an exit strategy. They also say you should understand your own talent and skills and acknowledge those you don't have yet that perhaps you need. Forty-seven percent of information security professionals say they would accept a lower salary if given access to more training and education. While 60 percent of information security professionals believe they're underpaid only three percent believe they are overpaid.

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