DorobekInsider on DC’s NewsChannel 8 tonight talking the Intellipedia and A-Space — the liner notes

Tuesday - 8/4/2009, 6:44pm EDT

UPDATE: See the video from News Channel 8 here

The DorobekInsider will be on DC’s NewsChannel 8’s Federal News Tonight program tonight in the 7:30p ET half-hour.. and we’re going to be talking about Intellipedia and, specifically, A-Space. And it ends up being timely given the announcement by the Marine Corps that the service is blocking use of the collaboration tools on its networks. The Pentagon also announced that it is going to review the use of Facebook and other social networking sites on its computers with an eye toward setting rules on how to protect against possible security risks.

Somewhat related… I posted about Intellipedia and A-Space recently — and Monday on Federal News Radio 1500 AM’s Daily Debrief with Chris Dorobek and Amy Morris, we spoke to Ahmad Ishaq, A-Space Project Manager, and Mike Woods, Senior Analyst for the Functional Requirements Team. Hear that conversation here:

Tonight on NewsChannel 8, we’ll talk about…
* What is Intellipedia and A-Space?
I mentioned this before, but Intellipedia and the intelligence community have really been a leader in the use of these collaboration tools. As I mentioned earlier, Intellipedia is a real leader in the use of collaboration tools. Intellipedia is highlighted by Harvard Business School Prof. Andrew McAfee in his wonderful upcoming book Enterprise 2.0: New Collaborative Tools for Your Organization’s Toughest Challenges. McAfee is credited with creating the term Enterprise 2.0, which is the use of Web 2.0 technologies  (set for November release – although there is an active effort to move up the publication date). Anyway, in McAfee’s book, Intellipedia ends up being one of his four enterprise 2.0 case studies — right up there with a case from Google. (In his book, McAfee notes that he doesn’t like the term “social media.” It almost discounts the real power of these tools. He refers to them as collaboration tools — and that’s really the point: They can help people share information.) And it’s easy to forget how important this is — just go back and read the 9/11 Commission final report, which highlighted the lack of information sharing. In the end, the government couldn’t find the needles in the haystack. The idea behind the these tools to to enable more eyes — and more sharing of information — could just enable more attention to the needles.

* How do these tools help the intelligence community collaborate?
The independent study conducted by a knowledge management consultant — you can read the report here — found that A-Space provides analysts with a area where they can share that information.

* Where does it go from here?
This is really the most interesting question — because there are some real turning points coming up.

I’ll post the video tonight once it is posted.