Vacation cybersecurity advice

Tuesday - 7/6/2010, 8:30am EDT

Cybersecurity Update - Tune in weekdays at 30 minutes past the hour for the latest cybersecurity news on The Federal Drive with Tom Temin and Amy Morris (6-10 a.m.) and The DorobekInsider with Chris Dorobek (3-7 p.m.). Listen live at FederalNewsRadio.com or on the radio at 1500 and 820 AM in the Washington, D.C. metro area.

  • You know what security measures to take when you travel, but some social networks and applications might make it harder for you to stay safe while on the road, if you're not careful. PandaLabs advises users to think before you post where you are and how long you'll be gone. NetSecurity.org says before you go on vacation, you should back up your computer information. Don't connect to unprotected WiFi networks. Don't use a computer other than your own, if you can avoid it. If you have to, make sure you change all your passwords as soon as possible, then delete all temporary files, the browser history, cookies, and any other information that may have been saved on the computer.

  • When it comes to cloud computing, federal agencies have a lot of work to do on the security front. According to a new report from the Government Accountability Office, federal cloud security lacks both policy guidance and a common way to assess whether commercial cloud providers meet security standards. The report specifically calls out three agencies leading the cloud effort. GAO says the Office of Management and Budget has yet to finish its cloud computing strategy. The General Services Administration runs into trouble with its cloud procurement because of security concerns. And the National Institute of Standards and Technology, while working hard, still has yet to issue comprehensive cloud security guidance.

  • There's some trouble for a plan to move thousands of contractors to Fort Meade. That military base having trouble wrapping up a final master lease to build a large office complex that will eventually house some contractors. Fort Meade chose developer Trammell Crow to develop two 160 acre plots in 2006. But a federal project officer cited in the Washington Post says crafting a final agreement has been challenging. The project is part of the Base Realignment and Closure process. Fort Meade will become the new home for the Defense Information Systems Agency and the U.S. Cyber Command.

Check out all of Federal News Radio's coverage of cybersecurity issues here.