Congress eyes cyberattacks options

Thursday - 6/24/2010, 8:30am EDT

WFED's Max Cacas with Rep. Yvette Clark (D-NY)

Click below to hear the interview

Download mp3

Cybersecurity Update - Tune in weekdays at 30 minutes past the hour for the latest cybersecurity news on The Federal Drive with Tom Temin and Amy Morris (6-10 a.m.) and The DorobekInsider with Chris Dorobek (3-7 p.m.). Listen live at FederalNewsRadio.com or on the radio at 1500 and 820 AM in the Washington, D.C. metro area.

  • A Senate panel this afternoon will begin marking up a measure that would give the Department of Homeland Security more authority over your agency's network. The bill was introduced by Senator Joe Lieberman, and it would set up a new office within DHS and the White House to oversee cyber policy. Among the measure's other provisions is one that would require OPM to change how the government recruits and retains cyber professionals. Recently, Federal News Radio's Max Cacas spoke to New York Representative Yvette Clark, who chairs the House Subcommittee on Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, Science and Technology. Chairwoman Clarke believes it's a good sign that so many cybersecurity bills are being considered right now. (Play the audio at the top of this page to hear why.)

  • Malaysia is currently conducting the second part of a series of cybersecurity workshops for the Organization of Islamic Conference member countries in the African region. Bernama.com reports CyberSecurity Malaysia has about 60 participants from 16 OIC member countries attending the workshop, which features a focus group discussion on potential projects to be conducted among the OIC-Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) member countries in mitigating cyberthreats.

  • Another government laptop has been stolen - this time from the car of a National Guardsman in Oregon. KPTV.com in Portland reports the laptop contained personal information that could compromise the financial security of individuals in the Guard. The computer is password protected and requires a military identification to use it, but the National Guard is still contacting everyone whose information may be at risk.

Check out all of Federal News Radio's coverage of cybersecurity issues here.