Breakdown of FY2012 budget by agency

Monday - 2/14/2011, 1:30pm EST

By Jolie Lee and the Associated Press
Federal News Radio

The President's fiscal year 2012 budget, released Monday, proposes a five-year freeze for "all discretionary spending outside of security," as well as more than 200 terminations and reductions of government programs.

Highlights of some changes to discretionary funding:

  • Defense
    Overall spending: $727.4 billion
    Percent change from 2011: 5.8 percent decrease
    Discretionary spending: $670.6 billion

    The discretionary spending represents an increase of $22 billion above the 2010 appropriation. This reflects continued investment in national security priorities such as cybersecurity, satellites and nuclear security. Although not subject to the President's freeze on non-security discretionary spending, DoD is undertaking a series of management efficiency and acquisition reforms that will produce a net of $78 billion in savings over the years 2012 through 2016 compared to the previous DoD topline fund­ing levels. Cost-cutting measures include the con­solidation of several Air Force operation centers, reduced Army construction costs and the Navy's use of multi-year procurement strategies.

  • Homeland Security:
    Overall spending: $44.3 billion
    Percentage change from 2011: 1.8 percent increase
    Discretionary spending: $43.2 billion

    The discretionary spending increases less than 1 percent above the 2010 enacted level. Increases were made in core homeland security functions such as border security and Coast Guard assets. Savings are achieved by the elimination of stove-piped and duplicative State and local grant programs, administrative costs, and professional contract services.

  • Veterans Affairs
    Overall spending: $129 billion
    Percent change from 2011: 4.5 percent increase
    Discretionary spending: $58.8 billion

    More than 2.2 million service members have deployed for war since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The budget proposal would provide $208 million in aid to caregivers who are family members of the severely wounded from the recent wars. It's part of a law signed last year by President Barack Obama. It would invest $183 million to help jumpstart VA's effort to reduce its massive claims backlog that's left veterans waiting months or years for a benefit check by starting to implement a paperless claims system. It would invest $939 million to help expand services for homeless veterans through private and public partnerships. It also would provide $6 billion for programs targeting the mental health needs of veterans, including those with traumatic brain injury. The proposed budget would cut spending for construction. House Veterans' Affairs Chairman Jeff Miller, a Republican, has promised to do a thorough review of spending at the VA.

  • Social Security
    Overall spending: $818.3 billion
    Percent change from 2011: 1.9 percent increase
    Discretionary spending: $12.5 billion

    The discretionary spending represents an increase of $1 billion above 2010, to keep the President's promise to reduce the backlog of disability claims. Invests in increased program integrity by providing $938 million, targeted at expanding efforts that ensure the agency makes payments to the right person and in the right amount, in order to generate cost savings.

  • Housing and Urban Development
    Overall spending: $47.2 billion
    Percent change from 2011: 15.5 percent decrease
    Discretionary spending:$41.7 billion

    Provides a gross spending (program) level of $48 billion, an increase of over $900 million over 2010 and a net level of $42 billion, a decrease of $1.1 billion from 2010. To help deliver on the President's commitment to reduce spending, funding for several grant programs has been reduced below recent enacted levels and increases were made only for the neediest Americans, including an initiative to combat homelessness. Continues to deliver a high level of housing counseling services, including assistance for families in danger of foreclosure, and continues to offer loss mitigation solutions for FHA-insured borrowers similarly at risk. Improves public housing and revitalizes surrounding neighborhoods by providing $250 million to continue HUD's transformative investments in high-poverty neighborhoods where distressed HUD-assisted public and privately owned housing is located.

  • Labor
    Overall spending: $108.8 billion
    Percent change from 2011: 27.2 percent decrease
    Discretionary spending: $12.8 billion

    The budget achieves savings through a reduction in funding for the Senior Community Service Employment Program, and transfers it to the Department of Health and Human Services to improve coordination with other programs for seniors. The Budget also includes a 25 percent reduction in the Job Corps construction budget. Invests almost $380 million in the Departments of Labor and Education for a competitive "Workforce Innovation Fund" that will allow States and regions to compete for funds by demonstrating their commitment to transforming their workforce systems, including breaking down program silos and paying programs for success.

  • Education
    Overall spending: $68 billion
    Percentage change from 2011: 38.5 percent increase
    Discretionary spending: $77.4 billion

    President Obama wants a major boost in education spending even as he calls for a five-year freeze on domestic spending. That puts him at odds with congressional Republicans pressing for deeper cuts aimed at reducing the nation's deficit. In his State of the Union address, Obama said investing in education and innovation was vital for America's long-term economic growth and global competitiveness. He urged America to "out-educate" other countries.