Chaotic influx of refugees to Lebanon stirs fears

Thursday - 2/14/2013, 4:48pm EST

In this on Monday, Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Syrian refugees who fled their homes with their families due to fighting between rebels and government forces, stand outside their tent, in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon. According to the United Nations refugee agency, there are now more than 265,000 Syrian refugees scattered across Lebanon, straining services in health, education and housing, pushing up prices and causing friction with Lebanese, some of whom resent their presence and blame them for everything from rising crime to the country's notorious traffic. The issue is particularly sensitive given Lebanon's long and complicated history with tens of thousands of Palestinian refugees who fled to Lebanon with Israel's creation in 1948, as well as Syria's long dominance over Lebanese politics. (AP Photo/Mohammed Zaatari)

ZEINA KARAM
Associated Press

BEIRUT (AP) -- For many Lebanese, the massive, chaotic influx of Syrians fleeing their country's civil war is evoking painful memories and real fear. They say the refugees pose far too much of a burden on this fragile nation still recovering from its own civil war -- nearly a quarter-century ago.

According to the United Nations refugee agency, more than 265,000 Syrians are now in Lebanon, a tiny country of 4.5 million with a dilapidated infrastructure which routinely suffers widespread shortages of electricity and water. There are more Syrian refugees in Lebanon than in any other country.

Unlike in Jordan and Turkey, where authorities quickly established border camps, the refugees here are scattered across the length of the country, straining services in health, education and housing and pushing up rent prices. That's causing friction with Lebanese, some of whom resent the Syrians' presence and blame them for everything from rising crime to traffic jams.

The issue is particularly sensitive because of Lebanon's long and complicated history with the tens of thousands of Palestinians who fled here with Israel's creation in 1948. Now numbering about 450,000, the overwhelmingly majority of Palestinians in Lebanon live in 12 refugee camps across the country.

Following the 1967 Mideast war, some militant Palestinian groups began using Lebanese territory to launch attacks against not only Israel, but occasionally against the Lebanese army -- actions that eventually helped ignite the country's 1975-1990 civil war.

Nowadays, gunmen fighting the Syrian regime cross relatively freely across Lebanon's porous borders in some areas, with Lebanese authorities largely unable to control the flow or keep tabs on the whereabouts of rebels and other Syrians pouring into the country.

Authorities say about 2,000 Syrian newcomers arrive every day, with the numbers expected to rise sharply if rebels enter the Syrian capital of Damascus, a 2
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