OFPP Administrator Daniel Gordon leaving

Wednesday - 11/2/2011, 12:26pm EDT

Office of Federal Procurement Policy Administrator Dan Gordon announced he is leaving to become the associate dean for government contracts law at the George Washington University Law School.

Office of Management and Budget Director Jack Lew announced Gordon's decision to leave later this year on the OMB blog.

"Two years after his arrival, we can all see the changes that Dan has helped bring about. On Dan's watch, spending on federal contracting decreased for the first time in more than a dozen years, coming in $80 billion less than it would have had contract spending continued to grow at the same rate as it did under the previous administration," Lew wrote. "Throughout his tenure, Dan has helped agencies focus on strengthening their acquisition workforce, especially by providing training, and driving the administration's commitment to tightening oversight of contractors, whether through a reinvigorated suspension and debarment process to deal with the 'bad actors' whose misdeeds no longer go unpunished, or focusing on the contract management role of contracting officers' representatives, who help ensure that contractors deliver what they have promised, on time and on budget."

Gordon came to OFPP from the Government Accountability Office where he spent 17 years. His last position was as the deputy general counsel in the government contracts office.

He also has served since 2002 as an adjunct faculty member for the George Washington University Law School.

Before joining the government, Gordon worked in private practice and also clerked for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

He was hailed by members of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, which held his confirmation hearing, as the "most qualified" candidate to be OFPP administrator in a long time.

During his two years at OFPP administrator, Gordon worked on a variety of acquisition issues from improving and standardizing the workforce, to overseeing the implementation of strategic sourcing to pushing for more industry and agency communication through his mythbusters campaign.

Gordon took on long-standing problems such as requiring business cases for new multiple-award contracts to help gain control over these vehicles, which have grown dramatically in the last decade.

He led the charge for a civilian agency acquisition workforce training fund, though he failed to convince Congress of its need.

Gordon also spent a lot of time trying to rein in service contracting. OMB found agencies were using "risky" contracts such as time-and-materials and labor-hours type contracts and wanted agencies to shift to firm-fixed price type of contracts. OMB required agencies to cut the use of these contracts by 15 percent by 2014.

"I want to congratulate Dan on his move to GW later this year where as Dean Gordon he will continue to use his expertise in the world of federal procurement," Lew wrote. "We will continue to build on his important work to make sure our procurement system delivers for the American taxpayers, so that the progress he has helped bring about will continue to be felt well beyond his departure from federal service."

Stan Soloway, Professional Services Council president, called Gordon a "thought leader."

"From his ‘myth-busters' campaign to his commitment to aggressively seeking input from all quarters, Dan has effectively sought to turn an environment dominated by hyperbole and rhetoric into a marketplace of ideas and constructive dialogue," Soloway said in a statement.

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