Army IT agency head departs for Energy

Wednesday - 4/25/2012, 12:16pm EDT

A new face is joining the IT leadership ranks at the Department of Energy just as the agency's chief information officer leaves for a new post.

Donald Adcock, who served from 2010 until this month as the executive director of the Army Information Technology Agency, has left the Pentagon to become the associate CIO for IT services at Energy. He will oversee functions such as enterprise operations, infrastructure management, customer care and IT project management, according to the Energy CIO's organization chart.

Donald Adcock, the new associate CIO for IT services, Energy Department

The change comes amid news, first reported by Federal News Radio, that Energy CIO Mike Locatis is leaving to become the assistant secretary for cybersecurity and communications at the Homeland Security Department. Deputy Energy CIO Robert Brese is serving as acting chief information officer for the time being.

At the Army's ITA, which serves as the primary IT service provider for the Pentagon and many other DoD facilities in the national capital region, John Berthiaume is now the acting executive director, an agency spokesman said. Berthiaume has been the agency's deputy director since last October and previously served in several IT and communications positions at the Defense Intelligence Agency.

ITA has been in charge of data center consolidation and several other IT mission areas as the executive agent for common IT services in the Pentagon. Its next major challenge is handling the consolidation of DoD's many networks in the building, Adcock told Federal News Radio in a March interview.

"I think as resources become more scrutinized, it's going to drive these changes," he said. "Budgets are shrinking and the Defense Department has to reshape. I think for the first time in a long time we have the change agent that we need."

RELATED STORIES:

Energy CIO Locatis leaves for DHS

At Pentagon, lessons learned on data center consolidation

Army IT agency performs big mission with little fanfare