Sleep is not an option, some feds say

Friday - 12/28/2012, 2:00am EST


We all know that sleeping on the job — with some exceptions — is not a good career move. But thanks to high-tech hand-held devices and others wonders, sleeping off the job, including in your own bed at night, may be on the way out.

Take this reader, for example:

"We were in a leadership meeting on a Wednesday at noon. We had a project due Thursday. Worked on the project Wednesday afternoon and sent it up for review around 5 p.m. Got comments back at 7 p.m. Sent some information to contractor at 9 p.m. and logged off (from home). Checked around 11:30 and the contractor had made the changes so I sent them on to the boss. There was also an earlier message from the boss that asked who I had invited to the meeting the next day. Well I hadn't because I did not see the need. Now panicking, I am sending invites out at midnight.

Go to sleep and getting ready to leave the house Thursday morning around 7 a.m., my BlackBerry goes off — it's the boss. 'Did you see the email yet?'

'The one from 7 p.m.? Yes I did and responded already.'

'No no no, the one from this morning.'

'No, I haven't,' I replied. I then received a 'learning' speech about how when you are doing an important project you need to keep checking your BlackBerry.

I guess sleeping is not an option, especially in the high intensity world of accounting. Oh, and those people I invited to the meeting... Turns out my guess was incorrect, so I had to uninvite that morning as well. — T at Agency X

Another reader shares this story:

"I used to stay late, if needed, and work Saturdays in special cases. But our organization works on the premise of: "It's not what you've done for me in the past but what have you done for me lately. Suffice it to say I give them eight hours, and that's it. With the impending doom and attrition, we will be doing more with less and this lesson needs to be passed on. I tell everyone not to worry; it will be there again tomorrow." — Been there, done that!


NEARLY USELESS FACTOID

By Jack Moore

The song "Jingle Bells" was originally published in 1857 by James Lord Pierpont to be performed at a Thanksgiving concert.

(Source: Time


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