Warm and fuzzy on Turkey Day

Thursday - 11/22/2012, 2:00am EST

This is supposed to be one of the biggest travel days of the year, which means that a lot of feds are on the job doing everything from air traffic control to guarding the borders or helping out in a VA hospital. Others may come in today and Friday too. Either out of need, dedication or for peace and quiet. Escaping visiting in-laws counts too.

Anyhow whether you are doing turkey, tofu or tacos, this is one of those warm and fuzzy holidays.

And whether you are sitting around a table outdoors in Texas, beside a roaring fire in Michigan or heading for Washington's Reagan National Airport, have a good holiday from all of us here at Federal News Radio.

Happy Holiday.

MC & friends.


NEARLY USELESS FACTOID

By Jack Moore

Chimpanzees and orangutans suffer from mid-life crises.

(Source: Slate)


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