Hot Enough For You?

Monday - 6/21/2010, 4:00am EDT

Some years ago I quietly pledged to strangle a "friend" whose standard summertime greeting was the very original: "Hot enough for you?"

Fortunately he stopped.

He got married and I suspect his wife, an upwardly mobile fed, told him (no pun intended) to cool it! Yet another example of the joys of finding a good woman. And listening to her!

Summertime always causes some problems in some federal agencies. Like what happens when the air-conditioner fails? And what is the line between dress casual for the office and an OMG co-worker who lets it nearly all hang out?

But if you think things are hot where you are, in DC, St. Louis, Houston, Austin, Chicago or Phoenix, consider feds who work in 50 degree (centigrade) temperatures. Like this one from a far-away fed:

    "I for one cannot wait until next week and summer gets here, so it will finely get warm and sunny here in Kuwait.

    "The below is part of the headline story on the Arab Times online.

      'The temperature, meanwhile, soared to 51 degrees Celsius (123.8 Fahrenheit) at around 2:30 pm (1130 GMT) in Kuwait City, the highest this year, according to the state-run meteorological office website. In the open desert at the Kuwait-Iraq border post of Abdali, the temperature soared to 53 degrees Celsius (127.4 F) for the second straight day on Tuesday. It is not abnormal for temperatures to hit 50 degrees in Kuwait, but the big heat wave has arrived early this year.'

    "But you should know official temperature is measured 5 feet off the ground in a self aspirating radiating shield (you and I call it shade). There is NO shade in Kuwait. Just for fun we put the thermometer on the sidewalk, it hit 145 degrees at 11:30. The cold water fed out of big white plastic tanks on the roof of my building to my shower, at 6AM is hot enough to put you in the hospital. Just reporting officially the temperature over 50C almost never happens. Radio stations can have their license revoked for reporting such things. The reason; the workers from Sri Lanka keeping the AC (air conditioning) working in Kuwait by law must be sent home if they work outside at 50C." Freshly Baked Fed

So, honestly, is it hot enough for you? Is the dress code helping? Has your office starting thinking about adding Gatorade to the water supply? Let me know!

To reach me: mcausey@federalnewsradio.com


Nearly Useless Factoid
by Suzanne Kubota

One in four men in the United States does not own a button down shirt.

It's the solstice. Happy Summer!


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