Conversations with Authors Series with Prof. Sandford Borins on The Persistence of Innovation in Government.

Friday - 7/25/2014, 3:11pm EDT

ON THIS WEEK'S SHOW:

What does the landscape of public sector innovation look like and what does this mean for innovators and those who study their efforts? How do awards programs promote innovation efforts? How can a climate for innovation be created in public organizations? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions with Prof. Sandford Borins, author of the IBM Center report, The Persistence of Innovation in Government.

Listen to the full show.

Download

GUEST BIOGRAPHIES:

(Courtesy of the IBM Center for the Business of Government)

Sandford Borins is a professor of Public Management in the University of Toronto's School of Public Policy and Governance, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, and Department of Management, University of Toronto-Scarborough. He was the founding chair of the latter and served in that capacity from 1991 to 2003. He is currently a research fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School. He has been a visiting professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley, and Scholar-in- Residence in the Ontario Cabinet Office.

He is the author of 10 books and numerous articles. The books include The Persistence of Innovation in Government (Brookings Press, 2014) Governing Fables: Learning from Public Sector Narratives (Information Age Publishing, 2011), Innovations in Government: Research, Recognition, and Replication (Brookings, 2008), Innovating with Integrity: How Local Heroes are Transforming American Government, (Georgetown University Press, 1998), and Political Management in Canada, coauthored with Hon. Allan Blakeney, former premier of Saskatchewan (University of Toronto Press, 1998).

Professor Borins has had a wide range of professional experience. He is a frequent speaker on public sector innovation, with recent presentations to the Australian Department of Industry and Innovation, Australian National University, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (Paris), Roskilde University (Denmark), and Public Management Research Conference (United States). He was a member of the board of directors of the Ontario Transportation Capital Corporation, responsible for developing Ontario's electronic toll road (Highway 407). He was the President of the Canadian Association of Programs in Public Administration, the counterpart to NASPAA, from 2003 to 2007.

He did his undergraduate studies at Harvard, where he graduated magna cum laude, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. He then took a master's degree in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and received his Ph.D. in Economics at Harvard.