Federal News Countdown: Shared-services strategy and cybersecurity bills

Friday - 5/4/2012, 6:11pm EDT

Federal News Countdown

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Today's guests on the Federal News Countdown:
- Karen Evans, the former E-Gov administrator in the Office of Management and Budget
- Dan Chenok, a senior fellow in the IBM Center for the Business of Government

Karen Evan's stories
#3 Google Street View in Israel: Tourists vs. Terrorists
From Huffington Post:

Google Street View, launched five years ago in the United States, has since then expanded to Europe, Australia, Asia and parts of Africa and has finally made its way to the Middle East. Israel became the first country to be added to Street View services last week, when images of the Holy Land officially went up on Sunday, April 20. Although the National Museum of Iraq in Baghdad is available on Street View, Israel is the only country to show its streets and cities (which thus far include Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Haifa).

#2 OMB gives agencies four months to figure out shared services
From Federal News Radio:

The Office of Management and Budget is re-invigorating the Lines of Business initiatives but with a bit of a twist. OMB issued its Shared Services Strategy Wednesday detailing the steps over the next four months agencies must take to begin chipping away at more than $46 billion in duplicative IT investments.

#1 Does Anyone in Congress Get Technology?
From Washington Post:

After 48 hours of serious coding work that seemed more suited for Stanford's campus, a group of staffers, bleary-eyed and tired, approached their boss with a new creation. Dubbed "Madison," they were set to launch a new technological solution that would allow for the drafting of Internet crowd-sourced legislation. This was not typical D.C. at work. These were no ordinary staffers and they worked for no ordinary member.


Dan Chenok's stories
#3 Big data could remake science -- and government
From Nextgov:

Big data has the power to change scientific research from a hypothesis-driven field to one that's data-driven, Farnam Jahanian, chief of the National Science Foundation's Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate, said Wednesday.

#2 'Stand Your Cyberground' Law: A Novel Proposal for Digital Security
From The Atlantic:

With the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), we're in a political tug-of-war over who should lead the security of our digital borders: should it be a civilian organization such as the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), or a military organization such as the Department of Defense (DoD)? I want to suggest a third option that government need not be involved--a solution that would avoid very difficult issues related to international humanitarian law (IHL) and therefore reduce the risk of an accidental cyberwar or worse. This option models itself on the (admittedly controversial) "Stand Your Ground" law that's rooted in our basic right to self-defense, and it authorizes counter-cyberattacks by private companies, which have been the main victims of harmful cyberactivities by foreign actors to date.

#1 OMB gives agencies four months to figure out shared services
From Federal News Radio:

The Office of Management and Budget is re-invigorating the Lines of Business initiatives but with a bit of a twist. OMB issued its Shared Services Strategy Wednesday detailing the steps over the next four months agencies must take to begin chipping away at more than $46 billion in duplicative IT investments.