Federal News Countdown: DoD cyber spending, contractor pay

Friday - 2/3/2012, 4:30pm EST

Federal News Countdown

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Today's guests on the Federal News Countdown:
- Trey Hodgkins, senior vice president for national security and procurement policy at TechAmerica
- Frank Reeder, founder, The Reeder Group

Trey Hodgkin's stories
#3 Amid cuts, DoD cyber spending a growth spot
From Federal News Radio:

Much of the discussion about the defense budget has focused on cuts the Defense Department has planned over the next decade. But at least one subject has been absent from all the talk about scaling back: cybersecurity.

#2 Cybersecurity Bill in U.S. Senate Falls Behind Reid Schedule
From Bloomberg Government:

Senate cybersecurity legislation, facing resistance from industry groups over its potential cost, is falling behind schedule, Majority Leader Harry Reid said.

#1 Obama calls again for capping government contractor pay
From The Washington Post:

The Obama administration is renewing its push to cap the pay of government contracting executives as the House prepares to vote on a bill that would freeze federal and congressional salaries.


Frank Reeder's stories
#3 Army praised for management turnaround at Arlington cemetery
From Federal News Radio:

More than 18 months after a scathing Army Inspector General report about the poor management and oversight at Arlington National Cemetery, auditors have a different story to tell.

#2 Federal Government Pay Tops Businesses: CBO Report
From ABC News:

It pays to work for the government. Compared with private sector employees, federal workers are paid about 16 percent more when benefits including health insurance, retirement plans and paid vacation are taken into account, according to a new report from the Congressional Budget Office.

#1 Personal Data's Value? Facebook Is Set to Find Out
From The New York Times:

Facebook, the vast online social network, is poised to file for a public stock offering on Wednesday that will ultimately value the company at $75 billion to $100 billion, cashing in on the fuel that powers the engine of Internet commerce: personal data.