2014 funding: Agency-by-agency breakdown of spending bill

Thursday - 1/16/2014, 9:34am EST

With the unveiling of the bipartisan spending bill this week, agencies are getting a clearer picture of how much funding they'll get for the rest of the fiscal year.

Thanks to the Paul Ryan-Patty Murray budget deal, which stopped some of the across-the-board sequestration cuts from continuing into a second year, many agencies are getting a boost in funding.

The House has already approved the $1.1 trillion spending bill, and the Senate is expected to do this week.

In the charts below, track which agencies will see sizable increases or which will be getting the short end of the stick.

A note on comparisons: Unless otherwise noted, funding levels for fiscal 2014 are compared to the amount that Congress appropriated in 2013 before sequestration took effect, also known as "enacted levels."


Agriculture

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$20.9 billion



$350 million above FY 2013 enacted levels

The Food Safety and Inspection Service will get more than $1 billion, a slight boost from sequestration levels, but less than what was allotted for the agency last year before the cuts took effect. The Farm Service Agency is slated to receive $1.5 billion, which equates to what the agency was appropriated last year before sequestration.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$3.7 billion



$195 million below FY 2013 enacted level

CMS' budget is set to remain about where it is now, post-sequestration. The bill provides $305 million to process and pay out benefits but prohibits additional funding from being used on Affordable Care Act spending.

Commerce Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$8.2 billion



$113 million above FY 2013 enacted level

The bill includes $3 billion for the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, a $91 million increase. The National Institute of Standards and Technology is funded at $850 million, which is an increase of $41 million above last year's pre-sequestration levels. The bill provides about $5.3 billion for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration — $310 million above last year's base levels.

Defense Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$572 billion



$32.7 billion below FY 2013 enacted level

The bill provides $486.9 billion in base funding and an additional $85.2 billion for overseas war spending. The base budget level is virtually identical to the department's current operating level and aligns with spending caps put in place by the 2011 Budget Control Act and supported by the Ryan-Murray budget agreement. The bill provides $160 billion for operations and maintenance, about $13.6 billion below fiscal 2013 levels and $92.9 billion for equipment procurement and upgrades.

Education Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$70.6 billion



$739 million below FY 2013 enacted level

Despite a year-to-year cut, the bill provides an increase over last year's post-sequestration levels. The bill provides a funding boost for federal education grant spending.

Energy Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$25.6 billion



$1.1 billion above FY 2013 enacted level

The bill provides $11.2 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration, an increase of $268 million above last year's enacted level and a hefty $874 million above the sequestration level. Science research is funded at $5.1 billion, a slight increase above last year's enacted level and $1.9 billion for energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.

Environmental Protection Agency

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$8.2 billion



$143 million below FY 2013 enacted level

While EPA's budget clocks in below 2013 enacted levels, the bill provides an $86 million boost above last year's post-sequestration level, which the Senate summary of the bill said will be used to stave off furloughs in 2014.

General Services Administration

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$9.4 billion



$1.3 billion above FY 2013 enacted level

The bill authorizes GSA to spend $9.4 billion from the Federal Buildings Fund, which is made up of rent payments other agencies pay to GSA for the use of federal facilities. Of that, about $1.65 is slated for the construction and repair of federal buildings and courthouses.

Homeland Security Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$39.3 billion



$336 million below FY 2013 enacted level

The bill provides $10.6 billion for the Customs and Border Protection (CBP), a modest increase from last year's pre-sequestration level and allowing for an increase of 2,000 additional CBP officers. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is slated for $5.3 billion, a slight decrease from last year's enacted levels. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is will see a decline of $225 million below last year's pre-sequestration levels. The bill caps TSA's federal screener workforce at 46,000.

Housing and Urban Development

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$32.8 billion



$687 million below FY 2013 enacted level

The bill specifically blocks funding for for new "sustainable" or "green" community development programs.

Internal Revenue Service

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$11.3 billion



$526 million below FY 2013 enacted level

Funding for the IRS remains at about where it was after sequestration cuts went into effect, which is about on par with fiscal 2009 appropriation levels. The bill slates $92 million to help address identity theft, refund fraud and improving taxpayer services. The bill also provides the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, which oversees the IRS, with $156.4 million.

Justice Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$27.4 billion



$338 million above FY 2013 enacted level

The bill provides the FBI with $8.3 billion in funding, the Drug Enforcement Agency with $2.4 billion, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) at $1.18 billion and the Federal Prison System at $2.7 billion. All of those are increase over last year's pre-sequestration levels. The U.S. Marshals Service received $2.7 billion in the bill, a $72 million reduction.

Labor Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$12 billion



$449 million below FY 2013 enacted level

The bill decreases funding for both the Employment Training Administration and the Office of Job Corps but boost funding for the Veterans Employment and Training Services.

NASA

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$17.6 billion



$120 million above FY 2013 enacted level

The bill provides a $781 million boost from last year's sequestration levels and provides $4.1 billion for the Exploration mission.

National Institutes of Health

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$29.9 billion



$714 million below FY 2013 enacted level

Funding for the NIH will fall below last year's enacted level of about $30.6 billion, according to House Democrats. However, the funding level is about $1 billion above the agency's post-sequestration budget top-line.

National Science Foundation

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$7.2 billion



$82 million below FY 2013 enacted level

While the NSF's funding is a decrease from last year's enacted levels, the bill restores $288 million in funding that sequestration had lopped off. The increase provides for more grant funding for teachers and scientists.

Social Security Administration

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$11.7 billion



$265 million above FY 2013 enacted level

About $1.2 billion of the SSA's budget is devoted to stopping improper payments. The increase will also allow the agency to restore staffing lost to budget cuts.

State Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$49 billion



$4.3 billion below FY 2013 enacted level

The bill provides a total of $15.7 billion in base and contingency funding for operational State Department costs. That's a total decrease of $2.4 million below fiscal 2013 pre-sequestration levels. Embassy security is funded at $5.4 billion, $25 million more than requested by the Obama administration. The bill provides the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) with $1.3 billion in funding, a $215 million cut from fiscal 2013 enacted levels.

Transportation Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$17.8 billion



$164 million below FY 2013 enacted level

In addition to the discretionary appropriations, the bill also provides about $53.5 billion in nondiscretionary "obligation limitation" funding for the department.

Veterans Affairs Department

2014 funding

Comparison

Highlights/details

$63.2 billion



$2.3 billion above the FY 2013 enacted level

The bill includes a total of $147.9 billion in total funding, including both discretionary and mandatory spending. The bill includes $323 million to bolster VA's joint project with DoD on electronic health records. The bill also includes $318 million to help the agency reduce a longstanding backlog of disability claims. The extra funding includes $140 million in technology upgrades and $90 million to pay for claims processors' overtime.

(Source: House Appropriations Committee, Senate Appropriations Committee)